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DWS to present 'Hello Dolly!'

joe.bellacomo@albanyherald.com
Caroline Davis plays Dolly and Trey Puckett plays Horace during rehearsal for the production of "Hello Dolly."

joe.bellacomo@albanyherald.com Caroline Davis plays Dolly and Trey Puckett plays Horace during rehearsal for the production of "Hello Dolly."

ALBANY -- Deerfield-Windsor School will present its stage production of "Hello, Dolly!" Friday-Sunday at the Albany Municipal Auditorium.

Dianne Giddens, Deerfield-Windsor music and performing arts teacher and director for the school's spring musical, said nearly 100 students will be performing on stage and behind the scenes to tell the comical story of "Hello, Dolly!"

"The show involves 97 children from both the upper and lower campuses," Giddens said. "We have 87 actors and a 10-person stage crew. It is really a family event, everyone is working really hard to put on the best show possible."

This year's light-hearted musical will be a departure from last year's performance of "Fiddler on the Roof."

"Last year was pretty somber. 'Fiddler on the Roof' is about a man and his family experiencing great difficulties, like losing their home. 'Hello, Dolly!' is very funny -- it's a scream all the way through," said Giddens.

The '60s Broadway musical is centered on the character Dolly Gallagher Levi, a brassy widowed matchmaker and her journey to Yonkers, N.Y., to find a wife for a well-known half-a-millionaire, Horace Vandergelder.

Throughout the play, however, it becomes clear that Dolly has plans to wed Horace herself.

Dolly will be portrayed by sophomore Caroline Davis, accompanied by sophomore Trey Buckett in the role of Horace.

Joining Davis and Buckett on stage in the role of Horace's clerk, Cornelius Hakle, will be senior Jase Wingate.

Performances are scheduled for 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, with a matinee at 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

Tickets are $12 and are available at Deerfield-Windsor's upper campus, 2500 Nottingham Way. Tickets may also be purchased at the Municipal Auditorium's box office one hour before each performance.

"I want people to have a couple of hours to forget about their troubles and watch this lady (Dolly) embrace life," Giddens said of her goals for the performance.