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OUTDOORS: Weekly fishing reports

Photo by Daniel Kay

Photo by Daniel Kay

LAKE SEMINOLE - Bass fishing is fair. Fish are holding in pretty good numbers around deeper wood structure and main-lake and upriver vegetation. Drop-shotting with finesse worms is paying off for some. In main-lake hydrilla patches, try medium-running crankbaits on a slow retrieve. Flipping dead patches of vegetation is also a worthwhile technique. Crappie fishing is reported as good in spots. Minnows are the preferred offering right now. Bream, catfish and hybrids remain extremely slow.

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LAKE WALTER F. GEORGE - Bass fishing is slow, though the spinnerbait bite has been reasonably active of late. When water temperature is inordinately cold, swimming jigs slowly through flooded vegetation may pay off. Focus on flooded grass and concentrate on spinnerbaits, shallow crankbaits and Texas-rig worms. A few crappies have been taken from deeper channel areas near creek mouths and bridges. Minnows and small blue-and-white tube lures have worked best. Bream, catfish and other species remain at a complete standstill.

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FLINT RIVER - There might be some improvement in the bass fishing when the weather warms consistently during the day. Shoal bass are not as active as they might be, but a few may be caught with shallow crankbaits or crawdad-colored grubs. Largemouths may bite from time to time working the banks near wood structure. Bream are very slow at present. Crappies and catfish are slow overall, but may provide sporadic action with an increase in water temperature.

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LAKE BLACKSHEAR - Where bass are concerned, few anglers are catching fish with consistency. Some largemouths are falling prey to slowly-cranked baits such as Shad Raps. Flipping dead vegetation may pay off from time to time, but not consistently. Crappies are fair. Look for them on creek channels between 10 and 15 feet. Use live minnows for the best results and try the occasional dark-colored jig. Catfish and bream are slow.