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Program an anchor for those it serves

Photo by Barry Levine

Photo by Barry Levine

ALBANY -- The Anchorage Executive Director Kenny Phillips is passionate about his organization and the men and community it serves.

And it shows.

"The Anchorage is one place you can be proud of in your community," Phillips said Thursday at the Albany Rotary Club's weekly meeting at Doublegate Country Club. "The difference is we don't charge for our services, but our clients don't live free. They cut grass, tend the garden, pick up trash on the side of the road and other in-kind work."

The Anchorage is a non-profit, Christian-based organization dedicated to the rehabilitation of men whose lives have been ravaged by alcohol/drug addiction.

"Addiction has no boundaries. It affects all economic, racial and spiritual groups," said Phillips, who has been with the organization for six years. "Our clients range from successful, well-educated professionals to the hourly shift workers. Addiction makes these men one and the same.

"At The Anchorage, there are no special treatments provided based on education level, income, race, or depth of spirituality."

Phillips added that while all of the 55 men currently at the facility share an addiction, they also have one other common trait -- they want to be normal again.

"We have guys here who truly want to change their lives, and we have some here who are looking to get out of situations -- legal and otherwise," Phillips said. "The biggest percentage of the guys are worn out and tired. They want to work, pay bills and spend time with their families.

"They are ready to be normal."

The Anchorage is open to men above the age of 18 who have successfully completed a five-day detoxification period, have no outstanding warrants or court dates, no serious health problems, and are comfortable in a Christian environment.

The average stay ranges from a minimum of four months to a maximum of 10 months. There are currently 37 men on the group's waiting list.

The Anchorage opened in 1953 and has served more than 14,000 men to date. The key, Phillips said, has been community involvement.

"The community has responded every time we have asked for help," Phillips said. "We have so many success stories."

Phillips said those wishing to help the Anchorage may call (229) 435-5692.