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Retired teacher Barbara Baugh of Dawson holds two books she's had published. Her latest book, "Eternal Love", is a tribute to her late father and is meant to raise awareness of Alzheimer's Disease.

terry.lewis Retired teacher Barbara Baugh of Dawson holds two books she's had published. Her latest book, "Eternal Love", is a tribute to her late father and is meant to raise awareness of Alzheimer's Disease.

DAWSON -- After losing both her parents within a year of each other, Barbara Marsh Baugh took comfort in a note she found pressed between the pages of her mother's Bible.

"Death is nothing at all, I have only slipped away into the next room." the note, penned by Henry Scott Holland, began. "Whatever we were to each, that we are still. Call me by my old familiar name. Speak to me in the easy way which you always used.

"Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes we enjoyed together. Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me. Let my name be the household word it always was. Let it be spoken without effort. Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was; there is absolutely unbroken continuity.

"Why should I be out of your mind because I am out of your sight? I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near just around the corner... All is well. Nothing is past, nothing is lost."

Her father, Andrew Marsh passed in 1997, her mother, Irelle, followed him a year later.

Baugh, a retired teacher of 40 years, has kept journals for years and used these notes to honor her father, who lost a long battle with Alzheimer's Disease.

The result was "Endless Love", a biography and Baugh's second book.

"The reason I wrote the book was to pay tribute to my daddy and raise awareness about Alzheimer's," Baugh said. "According to a medical report I read, Alzheimer's currently affects 5.3 million people in the United States alone.

"It is a devastating disease, and we need to find a cure."

After graduating from Troy University, Baugh spent her entire teaching career in the Southwest Georgia school system.

"My first job was as coach of the girls basketball team at Americus High," Baugh recalled. "Americus Principal W.C. Mundy came to Troy and got me. I loved coaching basketball. But there was a lot of pressure to win, and win with the right people."

Baugh left Americus to teach at Dougherty High for seven years before finally putting down roots in Dawson, retiring after 28 years in the Terrell County School System.

Her first book, "The House That Gave," was published in 2007.

"That little house was next door to our home in Ozark (Ala.) and Daddy let anyone in need live there," Baugh said. "It was full of so many different memories."

Baugh is currently working on a third book titled, "Manners Are Fun."

"I know I can write, but I don't know if I'm a writer," Baugh said, laughing. "I know it's a lot of fun."

Baugh's two books are currently available at Dawson Pharmcy and The Garden Center in Dawson."