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Emergency responders taking classes on preparedness ahead of Atlantic Hurricanes

The Associated Press. A boat is battered by waves in Sopers Hole during the passage of Hurricane Earl near Tortola, British Virgin Islands, Monday. The Category 4 hurricane was expected to remain over the open ocean before turning north and running parallel to the U.S. coast, potentially reaching the North Carolina coastal region by late Thursday or early Friday.

The Associated Press. A boat is battered by waves in Sopers Hole during the passage of Hurricane Earl near Tortola, British Virgin Islands, Monday. The Category 4 hurricane was expected to remain over the open ocean before turning north and running parallel to the U.S. coast, potentially reaching the North Carolina coastal region by late Thursday or early Friday.

ALBANY, Ga.: First responders and emergency management officials are undergoing training as we speak in Albany to be prepared for disasters, even as hurricanes move through the Atlantic.

Although the classes were scheduled weeks ago, the timing is perfect, according to emergency management officials who say that the training will likely help area public safety officials mobilize in the event of a major hurricane or disaster.

Deputy EMA Director Jim Vaught is teaching classes this week on the National Incident Management System or NIMS, which goes into effect any time there is a major public safety event, allowing officials from agencies on the local, state and federal levels to better communicate with one another.

The classes this week are being taught at the Law Enforcement Center downtown.

Wednesday, North Carolina officials issued a partial evacuation order for parts of the North Carolina Coastline as Hurricane Earl, downgraded to a category 3 hurricane, continued to churn in the Atlantic moving closer to the Eastern seaboard.