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NFL NOTEBOOK: Vick takes anti-dogfighting message to Congress; Progress in lockout talks

Photo by Carolyn Kaster

Photo by Carolyn Kaster

WASHINGTON -- Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick brought his anti-dogfighting message to Congress on Tuesday, backing legislation that would penalize those who knowingly attend animal fights and allow minors to attend.

Vick, who served 18 months in prison on dogfighting charges, said he wants to teach kids not to repeat his mistakes and to take profits away from sponsors of these events.

The football star has been speaking at churches and schools along with Wayne Pacelle, president and chief executive officer of the Humane Society of the United States. Pacelle told the news conference, "I had a lot of soul searching to do" before deciding to partner with Vick in efforts to stop animal fighting events.

"Help us to reach out to these kids before they go down the wrong path," Vick said.

The Hampton, Va. native said that while he became involved in dogfighting in his youth, he was unaware that more children are now attending these gruesome events. He said his own experience taught him that attending animal fights has an impact on children.

"It's up to the parents to take responsibility and make sure it doesn't happen," he said.

Sponsors of the legislation said the laws against animal fighting need to be strengthened.

It is illegal in 49 states to be a knowing spectator at an animal fight, while 28 impose felony-level penalties on those attending.

The bill would impose penalties of up to a year in prison and fines for attending an animal fight, and a penalty of up to three years in prison and fines for bringing or allowing a minor to attend.

The main sponsors of the legislation are Reps. Betty Sutton, D-Ohio, and Tom Marino, R-Pa., with Rep. Jim Moran, D-Va., co-chairman of the Congressional Animal Protection Caucus, among its co-sponsors.

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RETIRED PLAYERS JOIN NFL TALKS TUESDAY IN NEW YORK

Hall of Fame defensive end Carl Eller and lawyers for retired NFL players joined labor talks Tuesday as signs mounted that the league's four-month lockout might almost be over.

The court-appointed mediator, U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan, also was at the session, his second consecutive day overseeing negotiations at a New York law firm. Owners and players were trying to close a deal to resolve the NFL's first work stoppage since 1987.

The NFL Players Association's executive committee and representatives of all 32 teams were gathering in Washington to prepare for possible votes on an agreement in principle.

"The grass is cut, but the hay is not in the barn yet. We've got a lot of work to do," NFLPA president Kevin Mawae said.

Owners, meanwhile, are set to hold a special meeting in Atlanta on Thursday, when they could ratify a new deal -- if there is one. Executives from all 32 teams then would be briefed there Thursday and Friday on how the terms would affect league business. Clubs were told Monday that topics would include the 2011 NFL calendar, rookie salary system and guidelines for player transactions.

Commissioner Roger Goodell and NFLPA head DeMaurice Smith planned to stay in regular contact.

Still unresolved is what it will take to get the 10 plaintiffs -- including Colts quarterback Peyton Manning, Saints quarterback Drew Brees, Chargers receiver Vincent Jackson and Patriots guard Logan Mankins -- to sign off on a settlement to the players' antitrust lawsuit against the NFL that is pending in federal court in Minnesota.

On Tuesday, lawyers for the NFL and for the players suing the league submitted a joint request to the court, asking for an extra week to file written arguments "to allow them to focus on the continuing mediation." Tuesday's filing notes that "the parties have also been meeting regularly since April 11, 2011, in an effort to resolve their disputes."

Also pending is the TV networks case, in which players accused owners of setting up $4 billion in "lockout insurance."

Another issue said to be standing in the way of a resolution to the lockout: Players want owners to turn over $320 million in unpaid benefits from the 2010 season. Because there was no salary cap that season, the old collective bargaining agreement said NFL teams weren't required to pay those benefits.

On a separate matter, a proposal under consideration would set up nearly $1 billion over the next 10 years in additional benefits for retired players. That would include $620 million in pension increases, long-term care insurance and disability programs.

Retired players complained to the court recently that they had been excluded from negotiations, which is why Eller's presence Tuesday was significant.

Owners locked out players on March 12, when the old collective bargaining agreement expired, leaving the country's most popular professional sports league in limbo. The sides are trying to forge a settlement in time to keep the preseason completely intact. The exhibition opener is supposed to be the Hall of Fame game between the St. Louis Rams and Chicago Bears on Aug. 7.

The regular-season opener is scheduled for Sept. 8, when the Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers are to host the New Orleans Saints.

Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Michael Vick tweeted Monday: "Sound like we gonna be back to work so soon!!!"

During lengthy negotiations last week, players and owners came up with the framework of a CBA that addresses most of their differences.

Areas they've figured out include:

-- How the more than $9 billion in annual league revenues will be divided, with somewhere from 46.5 to 48.5 percent going to players, depending on how much the total take from TV contracts and other sources rises or falls;

-- A structure for rookie contracts that will rein in soaring salaries for high first-round draft picks;

-- Free agency rules that allow most four-year veterans to negotiate with any team;

-- A cap of about $120 million per team for player salaries in 2011, with about another $20 million per team in benefits.

-- Each team must spend at least 90 percent of the salary cap in cash each season, a higher figure than in the past.