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Pecan Harvest Festival attracts hundreds

Hundreds of people showed up for the 36th annual Baconton Pecan Harvest Festival Saturday. Tents and bales of hay were provided for those who wished to sit and enjoy their lunch.

Hundreds of people showed up for the 36th annual Baconton Pecan Harvest Festival Saturday. Tents and bales of hay were provided for those who wished to sit and enjoy their lunch.

BACONTON, Ga. — According to folks at the festival, the town was founded on pecans, so for 36 years the Baconton Pecan Harvest Festival has been celebrating the mighty nut.

photo

Pete Skiba

Saturday’s 36th annual Pecan Harvest Festival in Baconton also honored the Bacon family as Frank Bacon, a descendent of Robert James Bacon, the city’s founder, hosted the parade as grand marshal.

For first-time visitor Kenny Kimbrel of Leesburg the festival led to a question.

“Where are the pecans?” Kimbrel said. “I’d think a pecan festival would have exhibits and things about pecans. I don’t see any.”

Kimbrel was right. Pecans were hard to find at the festival. But once found there was also an explanation.

Sitting behind a table with glistening home-made pecan pies ready to be eaten, Pearl Chandler, pastor of Christian Life Fellowship explained.

“The pecan pies are really a good part of the pecan festival,” Chandler said. “But the real idea is to have people come out and enjoy themselves on a nice fall day in the town that was founded on pecans.”

People enjoyed themselves at various tents and tables offering barbecue from ribs to pulled pork and more. Some of the more acquired taste cuisine included pigs ears and feet.

A first time exhibitor at the festival, Martin Edwards of Baconton featured locally made honey from his Not Just Honey business.

“We live right up the street. This is our first year in the honey business,” Edwards said. “The festival has a real good turnout and honey sales are good. Many people buy it to help with their allergies. Its good in pecan pie recipes too.”

Children bounced in inflatable bouncy houses, rode ponies and traveled in a miniature choo-choo train. The rides commenced after a parade, whose grand marshal was Frank Bacon, a descendant of the city’s founder Robert James Bacon.

“We had a parade in 1954 then stopped it. It was reinstated in 1996,” said Baconton Mayor Annette Morman. “People like to follow the parade with fellowship here at the festival. it is a great day for our small town with a big heart.”