0

Dougherty commission plans to re-file disability plan

Richard Crowdis, county administrator, said that “no stone has been unturned” for the missing original ADA plan, mandated for all state and local governments in 1992, with a deadline for completion in 1995. The reconstructed plan must be submitted to the Georgia DOT by June 30, 2012.

Richard Crowdis, county administrator, said that “no stone has been unturned” for the missing original ADA plan, mandated for all state and local governments in 1992, with a deadline for completion in 1995. The reconstructed plan must be submitted to the Georgia DOT by June 30, 2012.

ALBANY, Ga. — At a Dougherty County Commission work session Monday, County Administrator Richard Crowdis revealed that a plan required by the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1995 has been misplaced and the information used to create the document must be recompiled.

According to Crowdis, the plan was required by the ADA of all state and local governments to transition government buildings and facilities to accommodate disabled persons. The federal agency issued the requirement in 1992 with a deadline for implementation in 1995.

Crowdis said that “there is no problem as to compliance.” The difficulty comes as a demand from the Georgia Department of Transportation, which is now requesting a copy of the plan.

“The Georgia DOT needs proof of our compliance in the event they’re audited by the federal government,” Crowdis said. “It could be necessary to receive federal money for road improvement projects.”

Crowdis said that they “have hunted and searched, leaving no stone unturned” to locate the plan, which must be submitted to DOT by June 30, 2012.

Crowdis said that in addition to recompiling the information for the plan, the county must adopt a “non-discrimination statement,” and appoint an ADA coordinator so that those concerned with noncompliance would “know who to deal with.” Crowdis said that the two additional requirements should be resolved at the next meeting and that he would have recommendations.

An overview of various state laws was presented Richard Crowdis, including HB 123, which defines a stun gun as a weapon when removed from a law enforcement officer. Under current law, it is illegal to remove a gun from certain public safety officers who are acting in the line of duty. This bill, effective July 1, makes it illegal to remove a stun gun or taser from these public safety officials.

Commissioners also discussed a new law affecting weapons permits. Set to become effective January 1, Senate Bill 308 states that all new weapons licenses issued after that date will be uniformly made, incorporating the state and county seal, secured by holographic and laser-image technology, with the applicant’s photo on a standard blue background. Because of increased production requirements, Crowdis expects the new permits to double in price to $30, he said.

Comments

Justice4Moma 2 years, 4 months ago

It is so strange how paper work keeps comming up (missing).Sounds like we have alot of "NOT ME's" in places they should not be.

0

Sign in to comment