Superior Court Judge Stephen Goss has set Oct. 21 to hear the lawsuit filed by eight current or former residents of the Seasons Christian Care assisted living facility against the facility and its principles, William C. and Charles Eric Eidenire.

Superior Court Judge Stephen Goss has set Oct. 21 to hear the lawsuit filed by eight current or former residents of the Seasons Christian Care assisted living facility against the facility and its principles, William C. and Charles Eric Eidenire.

ALBANY — Superior Court Judge Stephen Gosshas set a tentative Oct. 21 court date Friday to hear the lawsuit filed by eight current or former residents of the Seasons Christian Care assisted living facility against the facility and its principles, William C. and Charles Eric Eidenire.

Attorney Christopher Cohilas, who is representing the residents — Sam and Euvida Spivey, Betty Odom, Helen Blackwell, the estate of Genevieve McDonald, Virginia Sanderson, JoAnn Yarborough, Sylvia Johnson and Ida Preston — outlined the complaint for Goss.

photo

Chris Cohilas is the attorney for the plaintiffs in the case.

photo

Pete Donaldson is the defense attorney in the case.

photo

William C. Eidenire, left, and Eric Eidenire are defendants in a lawsuit filed against Seasons Christian Care assisted living facility.

Albany attorney Pete Donaldson stood in for the Atlanta-based Antonino Firm, which will represent Seasons Christian Care and the Eidenires, during Friday’s hearing. Donaldson confirmed via telephone the court date and an agreed-upon motion that there be no unauthorized transfer of assets or destruction of documents at Seasons Christian Care. Cohilas had asked Goss to rule on the agreement for the record.

“Judge Goss was very accommodating in allowing us to get a court date within 30 days of filing our suit,” Cohilas said after the hearing. “We appreciate that, and we’re anxious to make our case before him.”

Eric Eidenire said neither he nor his father would be available for comment after the hearing.

In addition to actual, compensatory and punitive damages being sought by his clients, Cohilas is asking for a temporary restraining order that will prevent the Eidenires and Seasons Christian Care from disposing of assets (including money) and is asking for the appointment of a receiver with the authority to oversee the disbursement of those assets.

“As you know, it’s going to have to fall into the category of extraordinary for me to grant a TRO (temporary restraining order),” Goss said.

Cohilas replied, “Even if the court does not grant relief, under the state RICO (Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization) Act, my clients may still be entitled to injunctive relief.”

Asked by Goss why the Eidenires and not just Seasons Christian Care were named in the suit, Cohilas told the judge the facility’s chief executive and chief financial officers had committed “tortuous acts” by converting funds for their own use.

When asked about Cohilas’ request for the earliest court date available, Donaldson said, “I don’t know if I understand (anything that would prompt) counsel’s claim of urgency from two weeks ago to today.”

Cohilas indicated during Friday’s hearing that former Dougherty Judicial Circuit District Attorney Ken Hodges might give testimony as part of the lawsuit. Asked after the hearing what Hodges’ role would be, Cohilas said he could not comment.

“It would be preliminary for me to report any possible involvement in the case by Mr. Hodges,” he said.

The Herald had gotten no response to a message seeking comment from Hodges by press time.