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Reporting from Ground Zero: 10 voices, 10 years later

European tourists Kevin and Karen Jones look at the World Trade Center construction site from an observation window inside the World Financial Center building which overlooks Ground Zero in lower Manhattan.

European tourists Kevin and Karen Jones look at the World Trade Center construction site from an observation window inside the World Financial Center building which overlooks Ground Zero in lower Manhattan.

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Daniel Watkins

Daniel Watkins

Age: 68

Hometown: N. Plainfield, N.J.

Occupation: Insurance

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I came into the city on the train under the World Trade Center, but I headed straight for my office a few blocks away. Otherwise, I would have been there when the first plane hit. As it turned out, I was about 30 feet from my office when it happened. About 25 of us gathered. Some of the women were screaming because at the very top of the first tower that was hit people had already started jumping.

That morning I was also concerned about my daughter who was working for me. She took the train to the World Trade Center every day also. It just so happened that she was sick that day so she didn't come in to work.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. After 10 years I still think about it, but not like the families who lost someone. Apart from the immediate families who lost people there, I think for most Americans, 9/11 is a reminder of what happened 10 years ago, but I think the concern of it has dissipated.

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Han DeLange

Han DeLange

Age: 47

Hometown: Friesland, Netherlands

Occupation: Attorney

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I was busy working that day. When I got in the car after visiting a client, I heard it on the news. When I got home, I first saw the TV images. Everything was 9/11.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. Life has changed for sure since that time. When you think you're safe, that seems to be an illusion now. Danger can be anywhere. A lot has changed since then. Every downside has its upside. In the end, things will get better. If you put the events happening now in the Middle East in a bigger perspective, I think in the long run it will help to make a better world.

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Rickie Murphy

Rickie Murphy

Age: 23

Hometown: Tralee County Kerry, Ireland (now New York City)

Occupation: Concrete worker at Ground Zero

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I was in Ireland when it happened. I was in my second year of high school, and I remember all classes stopped. The students went home and watched it on TV. I will never forget it.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. It was a real eye-opener. Things can happen in the world. Things you take for granted. It was an awful thing.

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Michael Hynes

Michael Hynes

Age: 58

Hometown: Hamilton, N.J.

Occupation: Insurance

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I wasn't in the city that day. I came down about six to eight weeks afterward. You couldn't get close back then. I went to St. Peter's Church, which is nearby, and said a prayer and went down to see the site.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. There was tremendous fear back then. I live in Hamilton, N.J., which is about 60 miles from New York City, and our area was the center of the anthrax scare a couple of weeks later. They closed the post office in Hamilton. We lost six people that day. You were just so on edge. There were also a lot of people who were killed who commuted to New York from that area. You just didn't know what was going to hit you next.

I guess we've been fortunate that we've gone 10 years without another attack. They've done a great job protecting us. This year, I will do exactly as I normally do. I will probably play golf and think about what happened that day. Even though it's 10 years later, you still think about what happened. You can't help it.

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Jimmy Swan

Jimmy Swan

Age: 54

Hometown: Jackson, New Jersey

Occupation: Heavy equipment operator

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I witnessed it. I was on Pier 3 in Brooklyn directly across from Lower Manhattan and the World Trade Center. We saw the planes hit. We saw the buildings come down and the horrible aftermath. Everything was shut down -- tunnels, bridges. They shut the city down. When the first tower came down, the piers, which rest on bedrock, shook like we were having an earthquake.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. Living in New York, you take precautions since birth. It's not since 9/11. You were born and raised to live defensively. You have to be from New York City to understand New York City. Outsiders think we are probably the craziest people on earth, but on the same hand we are the greatest people on earth. When you live in New York, every day is a memorial. You don't have to go to a special service and show your solidarity because it's in your heart every day. We lived it, we saw what it did to us, and it made us stronger.

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Carlo Francios

Carlo Francios

Age: 33

Hometown: Bronx, New York

Occupation: Operations manager for a building supply company

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I was uptown when the planes struck.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. I live my life the way I want to, which is to enjoy it to the fullest. Taking extra precautions, looking behind you all the time -- I don't do that. I just live life as it goes.

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Jackie Dobler

Jackie Dobler

Age: 23

Hometown: Huntington, New York

Occupation: Accountant

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I was in ninth grade at a Catholic high school, and I remember the priest coming on the loudspeaker and leading prayers on rosary beads. I had no idea what was going on. Shortly after, my mom came and took me home before I even know what had happened.

Some people I work with were here that day. I've heard of people who walked from here to Queens, a six-hour walk.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. Honestly, working here every day, right next to Ground Zero, it doesn't get any easier to walk by it. Every day you think what a disgusting, horrible thing happened here. They were just people going to work, just like me. It has changed my life because it has put a fear in me every day that I don't think will ever go away.

I will never come to work on 9/11. We all take certain precautions. We all have our cell phones charged and with us at all times. We keep a change of clothes, water and a pair of sneakers at the office.

Working here, I see people who give tours. Many of the tour guides in this building were here that day, and I sometimes overhear parts of their stories. It's just so sad. It still makes you scared, but you just hope for the best. It doesn't stop you from living your life.

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Gloria Fieldcamp

Gloria Fieldcamp

Age: 50

Hometown: New York City

Occupation: Banker

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I was on Broadway and Wall Street going to a business meeting. As I was coming out of the subway, I looked up in the sky and saw the second plane coming in. I was with my boss at the time, and we kept walking. Everyone was coming out of the buildings. I called my husband, who is a trader and was watching the news, and he said, "Gloria, just get out of there. It's a terrorist attack."

We turned and almost started running for the subway. It was interesting because, at that point in time, people were coming outside and just standing around and looking up. No one was moving anywhere at that point. We were probably the only crazy people running for the subway.

We ran and got on one of the last subway trains going uptown. I got out of the subway near my office in midtown, and I wanted to get a cab to go home. The taxi driver said, "Lady, get out of here! This is the end of the world!" It was very, very scary.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. I think it changed everybody's life forever, especially in New York. We always felt that nothing can ever happen here. It's not that way any more, so it has changed that sense of comfort.

During the recent earthquake, people were just pouring out of office buildings like maniacs. It was actually a little reminiscent of 9-11. Now people are extremely sensitive and tuned into these sorts of things.

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Mary Jo Barry

Mary Jo Barry

Age: 54

Hometown: Courtland Manor, New York

Occupation: Attorney

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I left the night before on a business trip to San Francisco. I saw it on the news that morning. My husband is a city firefighter. My first concern was for him that day and his friends. We both lost a lot of friends.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. It's been 10 years, and it is amazing how many people were children or not working at that time and don't remember. The only thing I would say is really different is that when we had a little earthquake recently and the building shook, people in New York didn't wait for directions. The building was practically empty in five minutes. No one thought twice or asked what had happened. No one waited for directions. They just went. That is probably the biggest change. Since then, no one is going to stand around and wait to hear if someone says to stay in the building or to get out. They are just going to get out.

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Michael Lackraj

Michael Lackraj

Age: 23

Hometown: Brooklyn, New York (originally from Trinidad)

Occupation: College student

Q. Where were you in 2001 when the attacks on the World Trade Center happened?

A. I was in the eighth grade. Our school had a direct line of sight to the towers. The school let us out, and we saw everything as it happened.

Q. How have those events changed your life?

A. I'm a little more aware of my surroundings. I look at everything. Something could happen at any time. It's best to look around and see if something doesn't seem right.