0

Squawk of the day - April 4, 2012

"At 26 years old, you are not a child anymore. You should not be on your parents’ insurance. You should be out of college and have a job. By the time I was 26, I was buying my first home."

For more squawks, pick up a copy of today's Albany Herald.

To submit a squawk, Click here.

Comments

coachjohnson42 2 years ago

Good for you....but some people are not so lucky.

3

gotanyfacts 2 years ago

I'm a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. - Thomas Jefferson

3

VSU 2 years ago

Are U feeling unlucky coach?

0

Sister_Ruby 2 years ago

Coach did not win the recent lottery.........so yeah......

0

Outtahere 2 years ago

I see what you are trying to say here Coach. Some people aren't as "blessed" as others. But... we have to work really hard to change our situation if we are one of the one's that aren't "blessed". Me included! I just keep hangin' in there!

0

Sister_Ruby 2 years ago

"Lucky..........." ? It's not a game of chance......it's a matter of taking the gifts and abilities God has given you and putting them to work. This isn't the lottery. Determination, hard work, and seeking opportunities. You know.......the American Way.

1

Susan123 2 years ago

It still takes some luck. Especially to find GOOD opportunities! Those are hard to come by these days! I know some people who have lots of determination, have worked hard, have completed college and are still having a hard time getting out on their own. That doesn't mean they haven't been trying and giving all they've got. And yeah, life IS a game of chance!

0

Sister_Ruby 2 years ago

You must go where the opportunities are. Remember the WPA? They buily the National Parks, the Hoover Dam, etc etc etc. But people today want a check to come to their mail box and they dread having to get up off their porch chair to go out and get it from the mail box. It's so tiring to have to walk all that far!!

0

albanyherald1 2 years ago

Amen! Quit babying these young adults/grown adults! Kids these days are so pampered and work ethic is being lost on these kids.

2

VSU 2 years ago

I have had my struggles, as well as my share of luck both good and bad, but for the most part I have been fortunate, but at the same time, as Sister Ruby said, determinationn and hard work has helped me through. I've been successful at some things and a failure at other things, but good or bad I hung in there and never gave up.

1

Outtahere 2 years ago

Well put and that's a great attitude to have!

0

VSU 2 years ago

Why thank you Outtahere, and speaking of attitude, I want to apologize for attacking you the other day regarding Sally O. That was between you & her. Sometimes things get a little crazy and out of hand on these comment sections. Hopefully there are no hard feelings.

1

Outtahere 2 years ago

No hard feelings and I appreciate your apology very much! Thank you! I do understand that it gets crazy here sometimes! Can we be friends?

0

Outtahere 2 years ago

Oops! I almost posted the same thing twice.

0

coachjohnson42 2 years ago

I think you guys should meet and hug

1

Sister_Ruby 2 years ago

New Wings place on Friday. Y'all can make it a 3-way.

0

Somebody 2 years ago

Sister Ruby & Coach...True love at first sight...or in this case "write"

0

Outtahere 2 years ago

I think we should too!!

0

USMCRetired 2 years ago

Lucky? Really Coach, you're going to say that someone taking responsibility for themselves is all just a matter of luck? When are people going to start taking ownership of their own lives and stop blaming everyone else for their personal failings? I grew up in a family of nine that scraped to get by with two parents that worked a combination of four jobs at a time to make ends meet. Their example showed me that you do what you can to provide for yourself and your family. They never accepted a dime of charity even when offered and instilled that self pride in all of us. In America, even today, ANYONE can make anything they want of themselves. It's just a matter of taking your future in your own hands and standing up for yourself.

Shame on you Coach. I hope you are not passing your entitled, defeatist attitude on to the kids you influence!

2

Somebody 2 years ago

Well said, unfortunately you have those that take the wrong approach of doing what it takes to provide for themselves and that includes those who steal, rob, shoot and kill innocent people for money or other valuables, and not because they have ran hard on their luck on finding work or jobs, but because they refuse or have no desire to go out and get a job to even attempt to better themselves. Kudos to those that do work hard, go to school etc.

0

USMCveteran 2 years ago

I blame the parents and the upbringing of today's youth. Active parents tend to have better results with their children while as in most of Albany it's obvious that most children are lacking parental guidance.

0

UseYourBrain 2 years ago

My son will be 25 soon. He is in grad school full time and will graduate next month. He is a 3.8 GPA scholar in a challenging program, and he works 2 part time jobs to supplement the allowance we provide for him every month. Any of you who think he has no 'work ethic' or that we 'baby' him don't know what you're talking about. I am happy and it is right that we are still able to provide health insurance for him.

0

gotanyfacts 2 years ago

You could do that without Obamacare. Pay for his individual plan. Liberals will claim that the extended coverage is free. That's just another lie. Extending coverage increases costs for the insurance companies who increase their premiums on all family policies to cover those costs. Then the premiums stay higher even after the son reaches 26 and falls off your policy. I am sure you are happy to help your hardworking son. What you fail to realize is you are being forced to pay for a lot of other, not so hard working sons and daughters!

0

albanyherald1 2 years ago

He is 25 and still getting an allowance? Guess he still lives at home? You pay his car insurance? Cell phone? Wash his clothes, clean up after him?

0

UseYourBrain 2 years ago

No, he does not live at home and is pretty self-sufficient. We believe in encouraging children who are trying to better themselves. Sorry, but your post sounds like sour grapes to me.

0

chinaberry25 2 years ago

We are able to pay is the operative word. So you are paying the bill? Parents should not be forced to do this. I know the state of Alabama parents are forced to pay for their child's college if they are 25 years old.. They never seem to leave the cradle.

0

jglass 2 years ago

UseYourBrain, you should be able to keep your son on your insurance as long as he is in school. I know there used to be a cut off age, but I don't know if that applies now. When my daughter was in college she held 3 part time jobs and took a full load of classes. So, it is up to the individuals how their work ethic is. I was raised that you worked for what you got, it was not handed out to you.

0

Sister_Ruby 2 years ago

You could always keep your kid on your policy as long as they were a full time student. Also, all colleges and universities have health insurance you can buy if you want it. In fact, colleges and universities REQUIRE you to have health insurance before you are admitted. Call the White House and ask His Royal Highness to please stop lying to the American People.

0

Susan123 2 years ago

Is this something new? Because when I was in college just a few years ago, I did not have insurance and I was still admitted. And I have a little sister currently in college and she has no Insurance and neither do our parents.

0

UseYourBrain 2 years ago

Sister Ruby is wrong. Health insurance is optional unless you are an undergraduate foreign student or you are enrolled in an undergraduate program that specifically requires health insurance. Read it at the Board of Regents or VSU websites.

0

LGadson 2 years ago

When I turned 17, my parents put me on the 12 Month Move Out Program! They told me college or military; and you MUST get a scholarship. Never went back home, except to visit. And that was 1986. My kids have the same option. Young people are smarter and stronger than given credit. When survival mode kicks, you really find out who Jesus is!

0

chinaberry25 2 years ago

I was at Westover High the other day and a black male teacher was talking to some students who where talking about welfare. He told these students that he loved to work and it was a privilege to have a job. It took setting goals. It is sad we do not have more folks like him. But we live in a society who has every opportunity to make their own luck. Free birthcontrol pills at the health clinic and 3 pregnant teenagers sitting in your 10 grade class. Is that making luck? On the other hand farmers who accept free handouts from the government are accepting welfare. Paid not to plant crops and drive pickups that cost $35000 or more. This is worse welfare in my opinion. But no, 26 year olds should not be on their folks insurance because who is paying the bill? Mama and Daddy, not them.

0

coachjohnson42 2 years ago

I look at it from a college parent's perspective. College students who are working on a bachelors and a masters and maybe even a PHD might remain in college until age 26......They may not have a decent job with benefits until they graduate. I dont mind my child staying on my insurance plan while he/she is still working on their degrees. That's just being a caring parent. We preach to our children about going to college, so why not take of them until they finish? But, if they drop out and start working....thats another ball game.....

0

TrixibelleBento 2 years ago

I paid rent to my parents after I graduated high school and got a job. I didin't start college for another 5 years, because I didn't have my parents spoon-feeding me or giving me a break. I worked my way through college, but still managed to have a bunch in school loans that I'm still paying on to this day. Am I bitter? Nope. Am I proud of what I've accomplished? Yep. Did I have any nanny state taking care of me? Nope.

Take pride in yourself and stop hanging on to your mommy's apron!

1

Holli 2 years ago

I must say I understand where Coach is coming from. When I was growing up the cutoff for insurance on teenagers was eighteen. I was going off to college on a scholarship when both my parents became very sick. My father was unable to work for a while and had numerous surgeries scheduled when the doctors found a brain tumor on my mom. I decided to stay home with them and work two jobs to help support their lack of income. I was 24 when I finally moved out and they were both healthy again. I was not able to start school for about a year. I believe what Coach is talking about is not every child has the ability, or the luck, to go off to college and focus only on school. By those standards I would have been a pharmacist like my sister-in-law at age 26, or already be working on my PhD like my husband. His parents paid for the first four year of college for each of their children. My parents worked hard to provide for our combined household and we knew any chance of college would require a scholarship and student loans. I may not have been able to start school as early as my peers, but I am about to begin my MBA program. I am 28 now, and plan to be finished around my 30th birthday without help from anyone, not even grants because I do not qualify for "free money". It suits me just fine though because I have paid out of pocket for everything HOPE did not pay for.

0

UseYourBrain 2 years ago

I hear all of you who had it rough to get through college. I did as well. I have lived on my own since I was 17 and paid for bachelors, masters and currently doctoral degrees on my own. Having said that, it isn't 'wrong', or 'spoonfeeding', or any of the other derogatory descriptors to help your children achieve their goals. It simply means you love your children AND you are fortunate enough to have the means to do it.

If he were not in school full time and working 2 part time jobs-believe me, I wouldn't be helping.

And TrixieBelle-you can say all you want that you are not bitter-but the fact that you consider helping your children to be 'spoon-feeding' them says a lot about the bitterness.

1

Sign in to comment