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YMCA gets $2 million to help at-risk students

YMCA Executive Director Dave Wallace, left, and Dougherty County School Superintendent Joshua Murfree take questions from the media Tuesday at a news conference to announce a $2 million Century 21 Federal Grant to provide after-school services for students and parents at Magnolia Elementary School.

YMCA Executive Director Dave Wallace, left, and Dougherty County School Superintendent Joshua Murfree take questions from the media Tuesday at a news conference to announce a $2 million Century 21 Federal Grant to provide after-school services for students and parents at Magnolia Elementary School.

ALBANY, Ga. — The Albany YMCA and the Dougherty County School System are partnering to provide after-school and summer programming to Magnolia Elementary School.

The project will be funded by a $2 million, Title I Century 21 grant and will be spread out over the next five years.

“Outside of capital campaigns, this is the single largest award in the history of the Albany YMCA,” said Y Executive Director Dave Wallace.

The program targets at-risk youth in the first to fifth grades who are struggling academically, along with parents/guardians who want to obtain job and life skills.

Program activities will be geared to meet 75 percent or more of the targeted students’ academic needs. Based on test scores and Magnolia’s school improvement plan, the program will provide tutorial services in reading and math.

Additionally, recreational, arts/humanities, science/technology, service learning and character education activities will also be offered.

“We, along with Dave Wallace and his staff, are excited about this collaborative partnership,” DCSS Superintendent Joshua Murfree said. “This is the type of community partnership we are attempting to build every day.”

Wallace said the program is designed to reach the entire family in an effort to break the cycle of poverty.

“This program will provide opportunities for families to gain further educational and life skills opportunities through after school and evening programing,” Wallace said. “These programs include GED, computer literacy, financial management, work/life skills parenting and nutrition classes.

“Helping parents earn a GED and acquire marketable skills such as computer proficiency, the program will provide more and better employment opportunities.”

Comments

waltspecht 1 year, 8 months ago

Now who, or which entity specifically, will be monitoring the program on a day to day basis to determine participation and effectiveness? Had that been done with the Stabbs's program, the waste of funds would have been discovered before they were all paid out. It is far easier to withhold funds than to recover them. As many Federal Programs have proven in the past.

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Sister_Ruby 1 year, 8 months ago

As long as the YMCA folks have control of the money, it should be OK.

However the stated goal "Wallace said the program is designed to reach the entire family in an effort to break the cycle of poverty" will only be achieved if those involved WANT to break out of the cycle of poverty.

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Cartman 1 year, 8 months ago

They act under a premise that federal grant money is not taxpayer money. Throwing school board tax money at the problem didn't get much result, so let's throw even more taxpayer money at it.

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FryarTuk 1 year, 8 months ago

It would be good to know the specifics of this program. For example, is this money/program administered by the DCSS? Is it actually school board money? What services are exactly provided and by whom and at what cost? What system of accountability is in place? Can Murfree, the ruling rogues and Sabbs be kept 100 yards away from the participants, the venue, the check book and the service providers? Who has the liability for failure to meet standards of accountability? As a nation we've got to get a handle on tax revenue being doled out and particularly with little or no accountability and expectation.

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