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Postal service to announce cuts next week

Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe speaks at a news conference in Washington. The estimated $3 billion in reductions, to be announced in broader detail today are part of a wide-ranging effort by the Postal Service to quickly trim costs and avert bankruptcy.

Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe speaks at a news conference in Washington. The estimated $3 billion in reductions, to be announced in broader detail today are part of a wide-ranging effort by the Postal Service to quickly trim costs and avert bankruptcy.

ALBANY, Ga. — Albany postal workers at the South Slappey Postal Service distribution center apparently will learn their employment fate Feb. 23.

Postal service changes are expected to go into effect on May 15, but notification is expected on Feb. 23, according to Assistant County Manager Mike McCoy, who participated in a webinar with the U.S. postmaster general last week.

The Albany mail distribution center on South Slappey faces possible closure, with the services possibly being moved to a distribution center in Tallahassee, Fla.

Post office operations will remain open.

According to a feasibility study conducted by the United States Postal Service and presented during a public hearing Dec. 6 at Albany Technical College, if the USPS consolidates its processing operations in Albany with its center in Tallahassee, the agency stands to save $3.5 million. The move could include predicted downsizing of 15 employees.

Dougherty County Commissioner Gloria Gaines expressed frustration at the USPS’s attempts to solicit public comment and suggestions just weeks before it intends to announce closures.

“It makes no sense to ask for input from the public if a decision is to be made by the 23rd,” Gaines said. “The decision has obviously been made.”

Commissioner Ewell Lyle said that the Postal Service’s decision to consolidate operations is one that comes after Congress has demanded more fiscal accountability from the agency.

“The Postal Service is the poster-child for federal agencies that seem to constantly be in the hole,” Lyle said. “Congress has demanded changes, so what do we do? Do we want them to be more efficient or do we not want them to cut jobs here at a center that is apparently underperforming?”

Dougherty County Commissioner Jeff “Bodine” Sinyard said that his concern lies in the fact that the USPS’s rationale for which processing centers should stay and which should close hasn’t been shared with the public, which may have allowed some efforts to be taken to work to bolster the Albany facility and save the jobs that will likely be lost if the USPS consolidates the Albany center with the Tallahassee, Fla., center.

Nationwide, more than 272 centers have been eyed for consolidation with more than 35,000 employees expected to be laid off, according to a powerpoint presentation available on the USPS website.

Comments

VSU 2 years, 2 months ago

No need to worry about this. The economy and employment picture is improving. If you don't believe me, just ask Obuma.

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atina3438 2 years, 2 months ago

With the advent of the oline computering, I'm surprised the post office can stay open at all -unsoliciated junk mail is all I get. Those people who choose not to have the home computer in their lives need to get their heads out of the sand!!

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Cartman 2 years, 2 months ago

Feds cut spending? What a novel concept. I like it.

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