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ADICA to weigh property purchase proposal

If brought to fruition, a proposal from a developer could lead to hundreds of thousands and possibly millions over the long-term, officials say.

The Albany-Dougherty Inner City Authority is considering allowing a private developer to purchase property it currently owns, much like it did recently in a move that allowed for the construction of the new Homerun Foods Convenience Store at 309 West Oglethorpe Boulevard.

The Albany-Dougherty Inner City Authority is considering allowing a private developer to purchase property it currently owns, much like it did recently in a move that allowed for the construction of the new Homerun Foods Convenience Store at 309 West Oglethorpe Boulevard.

— A developer is trying to get the board members of the Albany-Dougherty Inner City Authority to sell property its principals say could lead to a downtown development worth hundreds of thousands of dollars on the low end.

While negotiations for the piece of land and the development are allowed to be kept confidential under Georgia’s Open Meetings Act, Downtown Manager Aaron Blair said Wednesday the implications for the project, at least as presented by the developer, are big.

“If it comes off as the developer has imagined it, it would be something on the front end worth several hundreds of thousands of dollars and could lead to millions over the next few years,” Blair said.

Recently the board agreed to sell a piece of land it owned near Jefferson Street and Oglethorpe Boulevard, a transaction that transformed a largely vacant parking lot area into a new Homerun Foods convenience store.

“Anytime we can, we want to get the properties ADICA owns sold to private developers and back onto the tax rolls,” Blair said. “Sometimes we have to buy properties and do some minor work to make them appealing to developers, and sometimes they buy them and do the work themselves, which is ideal because very little tax dollars are being used. ... But those properties generally need to be transferred to private businesses to get off the rolls.”

Additionally, the board is considering what to do with the skate park it owns on the east side of the Flint River.

Blair said that a plan needs to be developed to utilize the facility either through ADICA or through a private entity.

“We’ve received some comments from some skaters on our Facebook page about some possible changes to the park that have led us to begin talks with the board,” Blair said.

Currently, the city of Albany’s Recreation and Parks department operates the facility from dawn until dusk each day.

Comments

whattheheck 2 years, 10 months ago

For the record, the Board did not "sell" the land for the Homerun store. If it had been "sold", there would have been money received by the city, wouldn't you think? But it is a documented "fact" the $306,000 parcel was "given" to an intermediary who in turn "sold" it for $87,000 three days later to the present owner. Not a bad return on the effort, eh? For the intermediary of course. Hopefully, it is a long term winner for the city but a jury should always hear all the facts before making its decision.

Most would support development that is a clear "arms length" transaction, but not "sweet-heart deals" we don't get told about. While I understand there may be a need for limited release of information at this point, we have had problems with "developers" in the past that have taken our money and provided little to nothing in return--promises and hopes were just that. So, it's ok to let developers give us a hug on the first date but let's don't give them a kiss until later, or perhaps never in some cases.

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Cartman 2 years, 10 months ago

Who was the intermediary? Public entity or private party? Let's keep this question on the front burner.

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whattheheck 2 years, 10 months ago

Destiny Property Group, private, Book 3815, page 242, PT 6- 047-2011-001174

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