0

HERALD ALL-AREA: Fans vote Worsham as People’s Choice Player of the Year

Westwood QB Mason Worsham, who ended his career with back-to-back state titles and a 26-game winning streak, passed for 1,670 yards and 19 TDs in 2011, and also rushed for 735 yards and eight more scores. Worsham won The Albany Herald’s 2nd annual People’s Choice Player of the Year honor this season with 10,211 votes case during a two-week online poll at albanyherald.com — barely beating out John Reynolds Player of the Year, Chris Brown.

Westwood QB Mason Worsham, who ended his career with back-to-back state titles and a 26-game winning streak, passed for 1,670 yards and 19 TDs in 2011, and also rushed for 735 yards and eight more scores. Worsham won The Albany Herald’s 2nd annual People’s Choice Player of the Year honor this season with 10,211 votes case during a two-week online poll at albanyherald.com — barely beating out John Reynolds Player of the Year, Chris Brown.

There’s a calm, a coolness that runs like a river through Mason Worsham, a kid who might have been born to play quarterback. If he wasn’t born for it, he at least grew up into it.

“I guess I’ve always been like that,’’ said Worsham, who grew up in a football family and played for his father at Westwood, where the Wildcats won back-to-back GISA Class A state titles and ended this season with a 26-game winning streak.

Worsham was at the center of that storm, And his fans realized what he meant to his team as Worsham received 10,211 votes at albanyherald.com to win The Herald’s 2nd annual People’s Choice Player of the Year award.

“It’s an honor, and I want to thank the people who voted for me,’’ he said.

Worsham threw for 1,670 yards and 19 touchdowns, and rushed for 735 yards and eight TDs, plus also played in the secondary. More than anything, he was the quiet, steady leader on the field.

“He’s composed and level-headed,’’ said Mason’s father and head coach, Ross Worsham, who had the luxury of coaching two sons this season on another unbeaten team. “When things aren’t going well he doesn’t get real upset, and he when he is having success he doesn’t get excited. He doesn’t get rattled. And he’s a hard worker.

“We always preach to do right,’’ added Ross, who incorporates that phrase at home and on the football field. “And he does.’’

Mason, a two-time GISA All-State player, finished a brilliant career at Westwood, where he was a four-year starter. He took his lumps two years ago when Westwood lost some heartbreakers, but once the Wildcats got rolling when Mason was a junior they never stopped.

He’s a natural at quarterback and has an accurate and lethal arm to go with enough speed to run away from most teams. And he has always loved the game.

“I guess I’ve been around the game since I was born,’’ Mason said. “I was only a few months old when I had a ball in my hand.’’

And he grew up with a coach at home. Ross was a former high school quarterback who was a receiver at Georgia Southern, where he helped the Eagles win a couple of national titles before beginning a high school coaching career.

“I was always around football, and I got a double treatment at home,’’ Mason said. “After games and after practice Dad and I will talk about how I did, how I threw the ball and how I played.’’

It’s impossible to argue with his numbers, his composure or his competitiveness, and there is simply no argument against 26 wins in a row and back-to-back state titles.

He does get mad, though.

“When I threw the pick against Thomas Jefferson (in the state semifinals),’’ Mason admitted.

So did he get flustered or rattled?

“(No) ... I was just determined we would score on that next drive,’’ Mason said. “And we did.’’