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Squawk of the day - June 26, 2012

"These poor schools are begging for the luxury of Junior ROTC and art and music and the luxury of summer school. Why don’t they get back to teaching the basics of teaching the children to go out and earn a living instead of asking for handouts?"

For more squawks, pick up a copy of today's Albany Herald.

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Comments

tocar 1 year, 9 months ago

I agree with the squawker. Allots is wrong with our DCSS. We have got to get back to basics before we can add anything else to the curriculum. We have so many now who do not pass and do not graduate.

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VSU 1 year, 9 months ago

I agree! You have a lot of students who can't learn the basics, some can't read or write or do basic math. The problem is the school board & #34 thinks everything is AOK. It's like the blind leading the blind.

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ugonelearn 1 year, 9 months ago

Education begins at home stop blaming the school system because you are too sorry or too stupid to reinforce what kids learn at school at home. The main people who complain about the education system do not have a clue of the task that educators face. Programs being taken away like music and art is the reason many kids do fail. All students are not the same some are gifted in music or art and may but not do well or be interested in the r's stimulatingcreativity is essential to a quality education.

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VSU 1 year, 9 months ago

Yeah, it's the parents fault that the teachers in the DCSS got caught cheating. Sure the education starts at home, but does the cheating start at home as well?

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PatrickY2K 1 year, 9 months ago

Parents who are doing their jobs have used this to teach that cheating is wrong - even educators, law enforcement, priests, and other authority figures can make bad decisions, but are not above the law. The television/XBox/internet isn't a babysitter, and does not replace conversation. It's a parents' responsibility to take advantage of teachable moments, rather than allowing a child to get everything from the outside world. Don't blame society for setting a bad example, blame the parent for not helping the child know the difference.

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VSU 1 year, 9 months ago

I don't deny that, but still you can't blame the parents for the teachers cheating. The parents can teach their children right from wrong, but that has nothing to do with the teachers getting caught cheating as if the parents instructed the teachers to cheat to help their child pass.

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PatrickY2K 1 year, 9 months ago

I can't find where anyone blames the parents for the teachers cheating. What are you talking about?

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VSU 1 year, 9 months ago

There was a post that apparently got deleted when I responded to it that makes it appear I am talking about an entirely different subject. It happens!

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chinaberry25 1 year, 9 months ago

Up to 8th grade summer school is paid by Title I. It is free and Federal Govt. pays for it. But what I am concerned with, who polices summer school. If they go do they pass the course or are they shifted up to the next grade. That is the way it seems to me. Cannot do fractions in 9th grade and still counting on their fingers in middle school. But they know the words to every rap song ever written.

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MRKIA 1 year, 9 months ago

THE PROBLEM STARTED LONG BEFORE MURFREE AND THE CURRENT SCHOOL BOARD GOT THEIR OPPORTUNITY TO SCREW IT UP FURTHER.

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waltspecht 1 year, 9 months ago

I think you mistook what the was meant. by the complaint. They don't have those programs, yet other systems that do have them are getting funding for maintaining them. What the poor systems want is the money to fund a basic quality education without the frills. Yet the larger systems, with all the frills, are the ones getting the funding

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bigbob 1 year, 9 months ago

When you got school board members & principles teaching them how to cheat the system what do you expect them to learn.

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PatrickY2K 1 year, 9 months ago

I'm so tired of hearing this. Adults have been accused of cheating and are getting due process. Which part of that teaches a kid how to cheat? If anything, it teaches that everyone is accountable for their actions. Even if some are not found guilty, I don't think the lesson will be that cheating is okay.

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Jimboob 1 year, 9 months ago

Maybe some are... Maybe some are running unopposed. Just sayin.

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VSU 1 year, 9 months ago

Depends on the individual. Some students can be easily influenced.

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PatrickY2K 1 year, 9 months ago

The teachers have been removed from the schools. How does that teach that cheating is acceptable? That isn't about an individual being easily influenced - it's about an individual misunderstanding.

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VSU 1 year, 9 months ago

You're talking present tense, I'm talking past tense. The students who were there at the time could have been influenced. just because the teachers got removed, doesn't mean those students memories went away. Just like a person getting shot and killed. the dead person is not going to come back to life just because the shooter got arrested and removed from the street. The key figure is whether each individual was or was not influenced by that teachers actions, and if they learned right from wrong with it. That is up to each individual, different people think differently than others. One may learned it was wrong to cheat, another may still think cheating is the way to go. The teacher being removed is no guarantee the student is going to do right.

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PatrickY2K 1 year, 9 months ago

The teachers are getting due process and being held accountable for their actions. This is a fact and not open to interpretation, even if "different people think differently than others." If a child hasn't had anyone explain that, then I hope the child isn't eating candy for dinner, staying up until midnight on a school night, or walking around the neighborhood naked, but has an active parent involved in teaching right from wrong.

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VSU 1 year, 9 months ago

That depends on the parents, there are a lot of poor parents out there.

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bigbob 1 year, 9 months ago

Removed from the classroom to get paid for doing nothing. Paid for doing nothing, sounds familiar for Albany doesn't it.

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darnette0101 1 year, 9 months ago

My children attended the DCSS with no problem. Why? I was a school ninja. They never knew when I would take a lunch break and show up. What did that accomplish? My children graduated with no problem. They were in band, art classes and ROTC. That was a big plus for them. To be in those programs, they were forced to pass their classes; especially with the ROTC. Those instructors were a blessing because they taught discipline, etc. Those activities are needed in schools. Put the parents back in their children's classes to share the learning responsibility with the teachers.

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Citizen_A 1 year, 9 months ago

Wanting the "luxuries" as the squawker calls them is not what is wrong with the school system. And I would even venture out to say that the majority of the teachers are doing their job, and many doing it very well. Yes, there are problems in the school system administration. Yes, there are some teachers/administrators that did some stupid stuff, and need to be held accountable. But until parents get involved in their children's education and enforce proper discipline, teachers can teach "the basics" until they are blue in the face. The lack of parenting is epidemic. There are a lot of parents out there that feel their responsibility ends when their children get on the bus. When I was in school, my parents not only expected me to go to school, but to do my very best. And if I didn't get good grades they didn't blame the teacher.

I think JROTC, Art, and Music are worth fighting for. And face it, summer school has been around as long as there has been organized school.

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PatrickY2K 1 year, 9 months ago

Having students educated through a variety of disciplines with the goal of producing well-rounded graduates is not a "luxury". A student who is failing math will not pass just because the class time is increased to "focus on the basics" - a student is less likely to fail math when he or she is motivated to learn, earn good grades, and graduate. This happens when the student looks beyond the math class and sets academic goals, often encouraged by exposure to a variety of academic areas.

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jglass 1 year, 9 months ago

darnette 0101 and Citizen _A, I completely agree with the two of you!!

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