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DCSS CRCT scores up in '12

ALBANY -- The State Department of Education released district CRCT results on Wednesday which showed the Dougherty County School system with an uptick in test scores when compared to last year.

Grades three through eight were tested in five different subject areas -- Reading, English Language Arts, Math, Science and Social Studies -- and saw improved scores in 20 of 30 subject areas from 2011.

The greatest improvement was in the area of social studies which saw upticks in every grade tested but the third. Eighth graders saw their "met or exceeded expectations" scores rise from 41.7 percent to 60.4 percent, an 18.7 percent increase.

Fifth and sixth graders also improved their social studies scores from last year by more than 10 percent

One of the greatest areas of concern, however, were math scores, which fell in every grade tested but the sixth, which rose from 70 percent to 74.1 percent, and seventh which improved from 88.6 percent to 90.3 percent.

Dougherty County

NOTE: The 2012 CRCT scores are preliminary and will be adjusted after summer retesting. The 2011 scores are final.

Third Grade 2012 2011

Reading 79.1% 81.8%

ELA 78.5% 84.5%

Math 70.8% 77.2%

Science 65.8% 70.7%

SStudies 65.8% 77.0%

Fourth Grade 2012 2011

Reading 78.5% 76.2%

ELA 82.6% 81.1%

Math 71.4% 74.4%

Science 71.1% 71.5%

SStudies 67.2% 62.9%

Fifth Grade 2012 2011

Reading 83.7% 81.6%

ELA 91.4% 90.3%

Math 80.3% 84.9%

Science 70.8% 68.6%

SStudies 68.5% 58.2%

Sixth Grade 2012 2011

Reading 92.7% 89.8%

ELA 89.6% 88.5%

Math 74.1% 70.0%

Science 56.9% 53.7%

SStudies 68.5% 58.3%

Seventh Grade 2012 2011

Reading 91.2% 83.0%

ELA 92.1% 91.0%

Math 90.3% 88.6%

Science 82.0% 88.6%

SStudies 74.9% 73.0%

Eighth Grade 2012 2011

Reading 91.4% 90.6%

ELA 93.0% 86.9%

Math 54.4% 67.4%

Science 57.7% 48.0%

SStudies 60.4% 41.7%

Lee County

NOTE: The 2012 CRCT scores are preliminary and will be adjusted after summer retesting. The 2011 scores are final. The percentages represent “met or exceeded expectations.”

Third Grade 2012 2011

Reading 98.1% 95.0%

ELA 96.9% 96.1%

Math 91.6% 90.1%

Science 87.2% 84.3%

SStudies 89.6% 84.1%

Fourth Grade 2012 2011

Reading 94.3% 93.2%

ELA 93.5% 92.5%

Math 83.3% 85.0%

Science 80.1% 77.5%

SStudies 74.5% 75.8%

Fifth Grade 2012 2011

Reading 95.9% 93.4%

ELA 98.0% 96.2%

Math 87.3% 84.4%

Science 81.0% 78.8%

SStudies 81.4% 76.8%

Sixth Grade 2012 2011

Reading 98.4% 96.5%

ELA 96.3% 94.5%

Math 85.2% 83.5%

Science 81.8% 77.4%

SStudies 74.8% 70.6%

Seventh Grade 2012 2011

Reading 96.1% 95.4%

ELA 95.7% 95.8%

Math 94.8% 93.3%

Science 88.0% 85.7%

SStudies 81.9% 79.2%

Eighth Grade 2012 2011

Reading 97.9% 99.2%

ELA 97.7% 95.5%

Math 80.9% 83.2%

Science 79.0% 72.7%

SStudies 83.0% 83.0%

The steepest drop in math scores came in the third grade, which fell from 77.2 percent to 70.8 percent.

"Standardized tests are meant to give teachers an indication of areas of instruction that students are not comprehending or recalling so instruction can be adjusted to meet the needs of the student," said DCSS Public Information Director R. D. Harter.

"The percentage of our third through eighth grade students meeting or exceeding standards improved in 20 of the 30 subject areas across the six grades tested by CRCT."

Harter added that the system's teachers will be getting additional training in the upcoming school year as the state moves to a new method of determining student progress.

"Our teachers will be receiving training this year to move our system to the new Common Core Curriculum Georgia Performance Standards," said Harter. "They will be aware of those areas that have challenged students as well as those where students comprehend the material as they teach to the new standards.""

The Lee County School System also saw increases in test scores, improving in 24 of 30 subject areas.

Lee's largest increase came in eighth grade science scores, which improved 6.3 percent from 72.7 percent last year to 79.0 percent.

That eighth grade testing group, however, also experienced the systems largest drop in test scores, after seeing its math scores fall from 83.2 percent to 80.9 percent.

Statewide, test results show more students are exceeding the standards than last year. Results also showed a one-year improvement in the percentage of students meeting and exceeding on 20 of the 30 content-area tests.

Officals say the 2012 scores will move upward all across the state after summer retesting scores are in.

"The best news in the 2012 CRCT report is that more of our students are exceeding the standards," said State School Superintendent John Barge. "Teachers are doing a great job teaching the more rigorous Georgia Performance Standards and they are to be applauded for raising expectations for all students."

DOE Director of Communications Matt Cardoza said that individual school results will be available no later than July 12.

Comments

waltspecht 1 year, 9 months ago

For the amount of the investment, in money alone, this isn't that favorable. If a Firm made that type of investment in a business, and this test scoring were the results, heads would roll and the investment stratagy completely rethought. The Public isn't getting what it is paying for in any Public School System around here.

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Happy 1 year, 9 months ago

Walt, what would you consider favorable improvement? Keep in mind that all of the teacher planning/professional days were taken away the past couple of years due to the 10 furlough days.

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waltspecht 1 year, 9 months ago

Favorable improvement, in a business sense would be 90% passing with 50% excelling. It doesn't matter about the days the Teachers have or have not. Maybe that needs to change. If I had the answer, I would state it. However I am not of this generation, and don't know which buttons to push. My generation behaved, or suffered the consequences. In Navy Nuclear Power Schools you either passed or were sent to a Captains Mast and reduced by one rate and sent to the worst assignment avvailable. Harsh maybe, but it produced some darn good Nuclear Operators. College you either achieved a passing grade or you were Drafted. You tell me what it is going to take for these youngsters.

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DCSSTeacher 1 year, 9 months ago

-Walt, you are absolutely correct. Planning and professional development days are not the reason these students did not perform at a high rate. I realize we have to look for gains wherever they are, but our passing rates hover in the 60-70% range for most tests most of the time. We might deviate above or below that range occasionally, but that is the norm. It is unacceptable and the reason is a systematic lack of desire to be better employees than we are.
-If I look around me at my slack, underperforming colleagues who are letting their classes watch movies or have "peer studying" (code word for chat time) during class, their test scores are abysmal, yet their yearly evaluations are "satisfactory" (because they performed the one dog-and-pony show lesson they have perfected for the administrator) and there are never any repercussions, then why should I spend 3 hours a night developing my lessons, stay before and after school to tutor, teach bell-to-bell, and research the latest best-practices on my weekends to stay up-to-speed? What's the incentive?! I can slack like everyone else and stop taking Botox for my stress wrinkles!

-It's an institutional problem that must be addressed by each administration on the building level...consistently and with no favoritism involved. It's not personal, it's business.

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waltspecht 1 year, 9 months ago

One thing I have learned in many years in management. All workers will drift to the lowest expectations Management will tolerate. The good ones will ask themselves why should I exert myself, when these others don't? We all get the same reward. The good ones will hang in there for many years, but eventuallly their performance will slip some. They will actually tell you who the slackers are. If you chose not to do anything about the slackers, that is where your whole Team is headed. That is where Administrators need to do their jobs. You can't necessarily reward the good workers, but you can use a discipline process up to and including termination to control the Slackers. The good workers tend to look upon this as a reward in itself. That is why I have been constantly pointing a finger at the administration not doing their job, and just remaining comfortable. There are a lot of eachers out there looking for a job right now, and from what I hear, there are way to many Slackers allowed to exist in the Schools arounsd here. Do your job, weed out the bad, and seed a fresh crop with highter standards. That is my advice.

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erudite 1 year, 9 months ago

Please don't delete this again!!

I wrote this yesterday and it seems to have disappeared. It is not surprising that in this buckle of the bible belt, science is not stressed. Additionally, if you think SW Ga can offer whatever you want, why bother to learn about anyone else and how they live, especially if you think the US is number 1 and everyone else needs to be compared to the US. The science and social studies scores are abysmal.

In a global technological society, these two areas are paramount.

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Jacob 1 year, 9 months ago

Maybe your point of view was not theologically objectionable. Perhaps they just found you to be boring and self important...

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erudite 1 year, 9 months ago

How is my post any more boring than others? What gives you the impression of self importance? Really, I would like to know. Be honest.

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Happy 1 year, 9 months ago

Unfortunately up until this point, science and social studies are not considered indicators for AYP (Annual Yearly Progress), so schools put most of their resources into reading/Language arts and math. Science has been added as an indicator, so I predict that these scores will increase as schools across the nation will put more emphasis on science. This is an issues that plagues our nation as a whole, not just south Georgia.

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erudite 1 year, 9 months ago

Most assuredly it is a national problem. There is a national movement to support STEM; it is one of the few ways that the US can compete. I was very happy with the other scores; it's just fine to be average!

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Hawk59 1 year, 9 months ago

Erudite, you are absolutely correct. STEM, or Science, Technology, Environment, and Math, is a Magnet program offered in Elementary through high school in Florida for years now is one of the best programs to prepare kids for college. My kids went to Magnet Schools and excelled through college because the STEM program. My wife and I really liked it because they start the program in elementary school,so in turn the students get used to constantly elevating grades....And don't worry about your comments. I enjoy your posts, and find a lot of common sense in them. Which is a lot more than I can say for most posts. Good luck with this group, seems as if you don't agree with most, you are automatically an outcast..Been one all my life, so I embrace it.

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erudite 1 year, 9 months ago

Thank you Hawk59. Outcasts unite! Oh wait, we can't; then we wouldn't be outcasts!!~ :-)

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Happy 1 year, 9 months ago

If the overall pass rate for these tests was 90 percent, the test creators would increase the level of difficulty for these tests. If you knew any thing about standardized testing, you would know that only 60-70 percent of students should pass a test, if it is dreamed a good test. Another way to look at it would be IQ. IQ scores follow the normal distribution on a bell curve. Educational testing is different from passing a test for mechanics, tradesmen, etc. if 50 percent of students exceeded on the test, either a. Someone was cheating or b. the test was not challenging enough.

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Happy 1 year, 9 months ago

Instead of dreamed, I meant to say deamed.

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Jacob 1 year, 9 months ago

You already know the answer to that. Your posts smack of superiority and it is obvious that you are attempting to insult and provoke other readers. Subtelty is not your strong suit and it is clear that you adopt contrarian positions just to anger other and get a reaction. Now you know....

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Happy 1 year, 9 months ago

Jacob, Just because I post an educated opinion? I asked a question to Walt to see whether or not he understood psychometric testing. Furthermore, all you seem to do is call people boring or insulting. If you don't have a comment on the topic you shouldn't insult others that do.

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erudite 1 year, 9 months ago

I think that was directed at me.

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erudite 1 year, 9 months ago

Nope, don't adopt the position to irritate; those are my positions. I have a different outlook than some and voice that difference. I do not do so to offend; I do so to exercise my right to free speech. I certainly do not think I am superior; I am just different.

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Happy 1 year, 9 months ago

Terry, I would like to see a comparison to 2011. For example, It would be interesting to see how last years 5th graders did compared to this years 6th graders. This reporting method does not show the increases or decreases among the same group of students.

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Terry.Lewis 1 year, 9 months ago

Basically you are talking about comparisons among cohort groups?

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MisterEd 1 year, 9 months ago

Why was my post about the CRCT scores and test in general removed? Did I need to type more stupider like _rureel?

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Hawk59 1 year, 9 months ago

To the Albany Herald...Does the two School Systems have the same number of students being tested? If not, it would be unfair to compare the two when it comes to testing. Maybe a School System with a closer enrollment number would have been a wiser choice. Not a local resident, but it would be a lot easier to get better results with lower numbers taking the tests.

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Sister_Ruby 1 year, 9 months ago

Perhaps the teachers have realized that they must teach during the year, not just cheat on test days. Or from another perspective....the cheating teachers have been removed from the classrooms, leaving the teaching teachers (and the replacements for the cheaters) to actually really teach the material. Simple!

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erudite 1 year, 9 months ago

How do teachers get the students to learn? You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink; you can lead a kid to school, but you can't make the kid think.

Some students come from families who do not really care about learning so the children are woefully unprepared for school. Not only do they not know colors, letters, or how to print their name, they do not know how to sit still, how to wash their face and hands, how to say 'excuse me', 'please', or 'thank you'. When a teacher is saddled with being a parent as well, knowledge gets the short stick.

Now that the dreaded NCLB act is waived, it may be easier to reach them and develop critical thinking/problem solving skills Teachers may now be able to teach. Let's hope so.

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