Here is some turkey trivia from Looking Back columnist Mary Braswell.

• Four places in the United States are named after the Thanksgiving bird. Turkey Creek, La., was the most populous in 2010 with 441 residents, followed by Turkey, Texas (421); Turkey Creek, Ariz. (294), and Turkey, N.C. (292).

• Turkeys have great hearing, but no external ears.

• The turkey was initially considered for the national symbol of America, especially favored by Benjamin Franklin, but lost out to the bald eagle in the end.

• Age is a determining factor in taste. Old, large males are preferable to young toms (males) as tom meat is stringy. The opposite is true for females: Old hens are tougher birds.

• In 2011, annual U.S. consumption of turkey was 16.1 pounds per person.

• Turkey production in the United States has increased nearly 110 percent since 1970.

• It is expected that about 248.5 million turkeys will be raised in the United States this year, with an average liveweight per bird of 28 pounds.

• The highest turkey-producing state is Minnesota.

• There are approximately 5,500 feathers on an adult wild turkey.

• According to the White House website, tales of spared turkeys date back to the days of Abraham Lincoln. In 1963, President Kennedy decided to send that year’s gift from the National Turkey Federation back to the farm where it came from. “We’ll just let this one grow,” he said. President George H.W. Bush was the first to actually offer a turkey pardon. On Nov. 14, 1989, he announced that year’s bird had “been granted a presidential pardon as of right now.” He sent the turkey on his way to the perhaps unfortunately named Frying Pan Park in Herndon, Va. And with that, a tradition was born.