0

Dougherty police officers deliver food for those in need

Dougherty County Police Department officers unload their crime scene vehicle of turkey dinners and a lot more food for the needy at St. Clare’s Neighbors in Need on Martin Luther King Drive Friday. Retired Capt. John Sexton (center in green jacket) just can’t seem to stop helping his police family with the charitable donations even though he’s retired. (Nov. 16, 2012)

Dougherty County Police Department officers unload their crime scene vehicle of turkey dinners and a lot more food for the needy at St. Clare’s Neighbors in Need on Martin Luther King Drive Friday. Retired Capt. John Sexton (center in green jacket) just can’t seem to stop helping his police family with the charitable donations even though he’s retired. (Nov. 16, 2012)

ALBANY — The Dougherty County Police Department officers delivered the Thanksgiving food Friday and it went to those who needed it the same day.

Hunter provides venison for St. Clare's

ALBANY — While Dougherty County Police Department officers delivered turkey and foodstuffs for the needy at St. Clare's Neighbors in Need program, a hunter showed up with a cooler.

Steve Cox is a deer hunter. The concentrated search for and stalking of a deer give him pleasure. When he takes a deer, he takes pleasure in bringing the meat to the volunteers at Neighbors in Need.

"I shoot and donate about 500 pounds of deer meat a year. It depends on how lucky I am as a hunter," Cox said. "I have it processed and I bring it here."

One man in the storage room couldn't get over the venison coming in. Along with the tenderloin, Cox also brings deer backscraps. The anonymous man said, "Backscraps, man that is like filet mignon of a deer."

— Pete Skiba

The about $1,900 raised by officers bought 30 turkeys and enough other fixings to feed a family of five for six days.

"St. Clare's feeds the needy daily," said county police Detective Tamiko Whitlock. "This area has a community in need and we like to help."

The county police have been helping for 10 years. And there was one who just couldn't stay away. Retired DCPD Capt. James Sexton joined with his family of officers to raise money and help unload the truck.

"He is one of the founders," Whitlock said. "He is still helping us out."

The officers also got help from several community groups that donated food. Notably the Westover High School cheerleader squad, which donated food at one of its pep rallies.

Rallying the officers to store the turkeys and foodstuffs that would be given out the same day, Tina Appollonio, Neighbors in Need assistant director, said the food would go fast.

"We give it out and there are so many people that need it, it is hard to keep up," Appollonio said. "I hope people realize that we could use food every day. We help people who need it every day."

Sitting in line waiting for a turkey, Priscilla Eady said she was very grateful.

"This means a lot for us in the holiday," Eady said. "With five children to feed it means a lot to have someone come in and give a helping hand."

Comments

dingleberry 1 year, 4 months ago

We give it out and there are so many people that need it, it is hard to keep up," Appollonio said. "I hope people realize that we could use food every day. We help people who need it every day."

One cause of the growing poverty in Albany is "free stuff". I see the EBT cardholders in the grocery stores every visit loading up on free food much of which requires no cooking by our "iron chefs". There are so many food drives this time of year that one can sell the EBT card and still eat well. Look at the size of those in the food line and tell me they are missing meals!

Albany's 2010 Poverty Analysis hit it on the head when it mildly cautioned that more subsidized housing creates the need for more subsidized housing.--and the same is true for food and all other free things Poverty is a "show me the money" business and in Albany, it's the largest employer, growing by leaps and bounds--business is good in the "Good Life"!.

0

Sign in to comment