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FlintFest2 offers a fine time near the river

Singer/songwriter Abi Permenter performs during FlintFest2 at Riverfront Park Saturday.

Singer/songwriter Abi Permenter performs during FlintFest2 at Riverfront Park Saturday.

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Joe Bellacomo

Manashwee Ghimire, 9, of Lee County, performs a traditional Nepali Dance.

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Joe Bellacomo

Artist Sean Mulkey has fun making a giant bubble near his booth during FlintFest2 at Riverfront Park.

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Joe Bellacomo

Naturalist Dale Arrowood presents Zar, an Eurasian eagle owl from Russia, to the crowd during the Flint RiverQuarium’s Wings and Wildlife event in conjunction with the downtown Albany FlintFest2 Saturday.

ALBANY, Ga. -- With a few "moves like Jagger" and a voice that visits the depths of love gone wrong, Abi Permenter opened the main stage at FlintFest2 Saturday.

The second annual festival featured Permenter appearing as AMP Up the Music on acoustic guitar and moved through more acoustic acts into a nightfall of electric energy with bands such as Unbreakable Bloodline, Good Doctor and The Heritage Band.

"I don't wear shoes onstage because I have to feel the music," said Permenter, a Trotman resident. "I just love playing at festivals. Even as opening act, I give it 110 percent."

Those a tad older might remember that Linda Ronstadt would often take the stage shoeless. Just as Ronstadt sang without lapsing into a pop-princess style, Permenter smoothly went through a rendition of Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams," nailing the song's undertow.

A good round of applause from those listening to Permenter broke out. Cries for an encore went unheeded due to time restraints. After her set, Permenter took a pen and signed the brim of a new fan's ball cap.

"I heard her voice, and I just had to walk over here," Jerel Hancok said. "She is really good. Her singing gets me. She could get really big."

FlintFest2 grew out of a combination of music and international festivals. The motivation was to showcase downtown's music and arts scenes and the diverse cultures that make Albany unique.

Artists working on canvas, paper and other media featured their artistry for sale or just enjoyment to passersby.

"Having this festival is just great," said Kris Letlow, an artist with the D'town Arts Coalition. "I just love it. People can buy, but I really just want them to know we are here as working artists."

The festival's international flair was showcased on the second stage throughout the event with Taiko Drum Dance, Indian traditional, Bollywood, Nepalese cultural dance and more.

Not to be outdone, the Flint RiverQuarium exhibited a Wings and Wildlife Festival on Pine Avenue. It was the first year it ran in connection with FlintFest. With a reptile wagon, a dive show at the RiverQuarium's Blue Hole, birds of prey on display and more, it was a hit with children and adults.

Every age group also enjoyed the various foods offered at the events. The Georgia Okinawa Club, among other venders, sold various foods for enjoyment including down-home barbecue, tacos, wings and probably anything edible fried that anyone could want.