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Poets, singers and others join to change

Timothy Jones plays harmonica and pounds out rhythm at the second annual "100 Thousand Poets for Change" art even held at Our Daily Bread on the 100 block of North Washington Street on Saturday, September 29, 2012.

Timothy Jones plays harmonica and pounds out rhythm at the second annual "100 Thousand Poets for Change" art even held at Our Daily Bread on the 100 block of North Washington Street on Saturday, September 29, 2012.

ALBANY, Ga. -- Songs, poems and music from Albany joined more than 800 events planned for 115 countries Saturday in what was called "100 Thousand Poets for Change."

The event started in Santa Rosa, Calif. last year and Darton State College teachers Roseanna Almaee and Patrick Garner of the English Department arranged to climb on board with students and community members.

"This is our second year and we were the first county in the state of Georgia to sign up last year," Almaee said. "Now Savannah and Atlanta have signed on."

According to the event's website 100tpc.org "Local issues are still key to this massive global event as communities around the world raise their voices on issues such as homelessness, global warming, education, racism and censorship, through concerts, readings, lectures, workshops, flash mobs, theater performances and other actions."

In Albany performers from the age of 9 through 80 recited poetry, sang songs and joined the movement to bring artistic recognition to the problems in Albany.

"We hope to have people talk about problems and find resolutions," said Almaee, "not just have a gripe session."

Garner said that he hoped the movement would gain traction in Albany and give other artists and artisans with their craft a way to approach issues here such as poverty and homelessness.

"Art and the voices of artists," said Garner, "can help affect change also."

Comments

ustaknow 1 year, 11 months ago

A woman from Los Angeles who was a tree hugging, liberal Democrat and an anti-hunter purchased a piece of timberland near Colville , WA . There was a large tree on one of the highest points in the tract. She wanted a good view of the natural splendor of her land so she started to climb the big tree. As she neared the top she encountered a spotted owl that attacked her. In her haste to escape, the woman slid down the tree to the ground and got many splinters in her crotch. In considerable pain, she hurried to a local ER to see a doctor. She told him she was an environmentalist, a Democrat, and an anti-hunter and how she came to get all the splinters.

The doctor listened to her story with great patience and then told her to go wait in the examining room and he would see if he could help her. She sat and waited three hours before the doctor reappeared. The angry woman demanded, "What took you so long?" He smiled and then told her, "Well, I had to get permits from the Environmental Protection Agency, the Forest Service, and the Bureau of Land Management before I could remove old-growth timber from a 'recreational area' so close to a waste treatment facility. I'm sorry, but due to Obama-Care they turned you down.

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