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Officials: DCSS moving forward

Dougherty County School Board Chair Carol Tharin, right, addresses the crowd at the Albany Civil Rights Institute’s Education Night on Thursday. From left are Westover Principal William Chunn, DCSS Curriculum Director Ufot Inyang, Interim Superintendent Butch Mosley and Commodore Conyers listen. (April 25, 2013)

Dougherty County School Board Chair Carol Tharin, right, addresses the crowd at the Albany Civil Rights Institute’s Education Night on Thursday. From left are Westover Principal William Chunn, DCSS Curriculum Director Ufot Inyang, Interim Superintendent Butch Mosley and Commodore Conyers listen. (April 25, 2013)

ALBANY, Ga. -- The Albany Civil Rights Institute's monthly community night on Thursday featured several members of the Dougherty County School System, Including Iterim Superintendent Butch Mosley, who gave his visions of upcoming changes within the district.

In addition to Mosley, the DCSS panel also included School Board Chair Carol Tharin, Director of Curriculum and Instruction Ufot Inyang and Westover High Principal William Chunn.

"We are going to see a whole new look (in the DCSS) and we are going to start reading about quality education in Dougherty County," former School Board member Commodore Conyers said in introducing the panel. "Quality education for our children. That's what we really need. That's what we really want."

Tharin pointed out the new faces on the board and in the administration, saying these were signs of system officials' seriousness about facing the daunting challenges before the schools. She also noted an uptick in attendance at board meetings.

"I remember in the past we used to have to beg people to get involved and show up for board meetings," She said. "I have been encouraged at the number of people who have shown up lately. It's an interesting process. It's your board and your school system."

Mosley, a long-time south Georgia school administrator who replaced former superintendent Joshua Murfree in January, said he would like to return the DCSS to the days of being one of the top school systems in south Georgia.

"When I began my career as an educator in south Georgia, the Dougherty County School System was regarded as the epitome of education in the region," Mosley said. "Somewhere along the way, they got a little slack. There is a lot of good in this system, but unfortunately the negative has outweighed the good.

"What we currently have is just 3 percent -- students, parents, teachers and administrators -- are causing all the problems. The other 97 percent are doing things the right way. This is prevalent throughout society. It's our job to fix that 3 percent."

Mosley said when he was approached about becoming the interim superintendent, be pursued the opening.

"Make no mistake, I wanted this job. We have some new people in place now and we will have some more new people soon," he said. "We are going to pull together as a team and there is no doubt in my mind that we can make a difference.

"We are working hard toward that improvement right now. I hope that you are beginning to see some of the results. We have the talent to bring us back to where the Dougherty County School System will once again be the district in south Georgia that every one looks up to."

Mosley then laid out his plan to restore lost luster to the DCSS.

"Look, getting a good education is not rocket science," the superintendent said. "The key is putting the right people in the right spots. We are committed to moving our system forward. We just have to produce."

Comments

FryarTuk 1 year, 3 months ago

Mosley if you really believe only 3% of staff and students are creating the challenges and problems, you are in for a rude awakening. It's disappointing to hear him say that sort of thing because it provokes questions about his depth of understanding about the students in the school district. A much larger percentage than 3% of the schools and students are in major trouble.

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RedEric 1 year, 3 months ago

A school is like an assembly line. Every year the children are supposed to pick up additional knowledge. When you have fifth graders who cannot read with comprehension. That failure has to make its through the system. It will take years to clean up the school. I hope enthusiasm lasts long enough.

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sad_for_albany 1 year, 3 months ago

FryarTuck, What would you have him do, fire the whole lot and start over? If he starts with the 3% that is the worst and fixes that, then does the next 3% and so on, you have an orderly and managable solution. DCCS didn't just go bad under the former superintendent. It had been rotting for years. Same way with fixing it. It won't all get fixed this summer. Put we can sure get rid of the sure enough incompentent folks first.

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FryarTuk 1 year, 3 months ago

" If he starts with the 3% that is the worst and fixes that, then does the next 3% and so on, you have an orderly and managable solution." But that is a different message than was given. There isn't a quick fix for this and probably will not be a wham, bam, thanky mam proposition. If you don't talk straight up with people you get in deep water quickly. Telling folks you got a 3% problem means you better have a 3% solution. That's a bad medicine show and more akin to snake oil.

I agree the problem has been festering for well over a decade and it will take a time consuming process to fix and the people of DoCo need to hear this along with a message of "we can and will do this!"

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FryarTuk 1 year, 3 months ago

Pardon, the Mediacom cable keeps going on and off when I submit.

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oldster 1 year, 3 months ago

I would think that one would have to be careful and not fire too many teachers because there are not a lot of good teachers beating on the door trying to get into the DCSS. Fire a few and hope that it lights a fire under the rest of the slackers. Recruiting good teachers to come here will be difficult.

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