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Walters touts Lee County schools at Rotary Club

Lee County Schools Superintendent Larry Walters told members of the Dougherty County Rotary Club Tuesday that education was the “signature” of Lee County and the entire county was working hard to maintain that status.

Lee County Schools Superintendent Larry Walters told members of the Dougherty County Rotary Club Tuesday that education was the “signature” of Lee County and the entire county was working hard to maintain that status.

ALBANY, Ga. — Lee County Schools Superintendent Larry Walter positively glows when he talks about his school system. Walters, who has been superintendent for 11 years, credits the Board of Education and involved parents for much of the success the district enjoys.

“We have the commitment of our BOE to make the system the best it can be for all of our students,” Walters told the Dougherty Rotary Club on Tuesday. “Education is our signature in Lee County. That is what we are known for, and we work very hard to maintain that level of excellence.”

On Friday, Walters said, he expects the system to welcome more than 6,300 students to the first day of the 2013-14 school year. He added that the system has more than 800 full-time employees and contributes a monthly payroll of $3.5 million, much of which finds its way into into Lee and Dougherty County’s coffers.

“One thing we have in Lee County is a strong connection to the community,” Walters said. “We are all Trojans. Our little Trojans in pre-k become big Trojans in high school. This is the connection we have with the parents and the people of the community, and we value that support.”

Walters is excited about the opening of the new $14 million Lee County Elementary School on Lover’s Lane Road. He said that will allow a second middle school to come online and relieve the crowding from having just one middle school.

The superintendent added that the system will begin a BYOT (bring your own technology) program this year, allowing students to use their tablets and smartphones in class.

“Sometimes theses kids have better technology than we can provide,” Walters said. “In the past, we would pick up the devices and make them pay a fine to get them back. Now we are embracing the concept.

“We’ll still control where they go online, but we think the possible benefits outweigh the risk of creating distractions.”