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Interim Dougherty School Superintendent Butch Mosely under consideration for permanent appointment

Deadline for applications Dougherty County School System supertintendent is Jan. 24

Dougherty County Schools Interim Superintendent Butch Mosely has said he would consider becoming the DCSS’s permanent superintendent if the School Board wants him and the two parties can reach an agreement on salary, benefits and length of contract. (Staff Photo: Terry Lewis)

Dougherty County Schools Interim Superintendent Butch Mosely has said he would consider becoming the DCSS’s permanent superintendent if the School Board wants him and the two parties can reach an agreement on salary, benefits and length of contract. (Staff Photo: Terry Lewis)

ALBANY — Dougherty County School Board meetings are known for their unpredictable nature, but Monday’s meeting should be very interesting for several different reasons.

For starters, the school system announced late last week that the board will conduct a “public listening session” at 5 p.m. to hear from community members about the characteristics they are looking for in Dougherty County’s next school superintendent. The board will take community input into consideration as the search for a permanent superintendent progresses.

System officials said those wishing to contribute ideas to the board should sign in upon arrival at the meeting and should arrive early to register and be scheduled to speak. The session, which will be held at the School Administration Building, 200 Pine Ave.,will be moderated by Bill Sampson, a representative of the Georgia School Boards Associations that was retained to manage the search process.

The Board has set a Jan. 24 deadline for applications for the position.

A new twist was added to the search recently as The Albany Herald has learned that Interim Superintendent Butch Mosely has been asked by at least two board members to consider taking the job full-time after his current contract expires in June. The Herald has also learned that the votes are currently in place to make Mosely the permanent superintendent.

For his part, Mosley has made no secret that he is pleased with the progress the system has made since he assumed the interim role in January. None of the parties involved would go on record with comments on this development.

Mosely, 72, would have to suspend his pension from the Teacher Retirement System of Georgia to become the permanent superintendent with a new contract of two or three years. Mosely said last week he would consider taking the job if he and the board could agree on a satisfactory salary and benefits package.

During the board’s briefing, which is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m., a reduction in staff furlough days is expected to be discussed.

At a meeting of the School Board’s Finance Committee last week, Director of Finance and Operations Ken Dyer reported that the system’s reserve fund held nearly $1.5 million more than it did at the same time last year and was pushing nearly $12 million total.

That led to a committee discussion of the system dropping one of the current five employee furlough days before Christmas.

“I would certainly support and recommend the elimination of a furlough day if Mr. Dyer thinks we can handle it,” Mosely said.

“Oh, I think we can handle it,” Dyer answered.

While the elimination of a furlough day was not on the board’s agenda, it could be added and voted upon Monday.

“I am definitely going to recommend it to the board,” Mosely said Saturday. “We have the money and it’s the right thing to do. I’ve spoken with Ken and if the board approves, we are going to try to get the money added to (the employees’) next pay checks.”