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Bill will boost Southwest Georgia economy

ALBANY, Ga. -- For the radical "no taxes" crowd, whose reaction to recent media information about House Bill 386 and its impact on motor vehicle taxes in the state has resulted in typical knee-jerk commentary, an area state legislator has a suggestion:

Read the bill.

"Unfortunately, the typical media response to any new legislation is 'let me show the worst case from the bill without looking at the whole thing,'" state Rep. Ed Rynders, R-Leesburg, said. "And, also unfortunately, so many folks respond to what they read and see in the media. They don't bother to read the entire bill.

"A lot of the people who complained about members of Congress not reading the (federal) health care bill before passing it are complaining about HB 386 without reading it. I believe they'd see things differently if they did."

Rynders said that while most of the emphasis on HB 386 has surrounded the new motor vehicle tax that will tax casual automobile sales for the first time, Southwest Georgians should take a much closer look at the legislation before criticizing.

"Who is the second-leading user of energy in the state right now? Procter & Gamble," Rynders said. "And what has Procter & Gamble been trying to do for years? Get rid of the energy tax in the state. And since Georgia is the only state in the Southeast with an energy tax, I would think people in Southwest Georgia would be particularly happy to see legislation -- like HB 386 -- which phases out the energy tax.

"And did you know that Thrush -- right there in Albany -- is one of only two manufacturers of cropdusters in the United States, and its competitor in Texas gets a tax break on every plane it sells? Were you aware that HB 386 helps make Thrush more competitive?"

Rynders said the economic development advantages of HB 386 do not end there.

"I'm sure you're aware of the complaints married couples have had about deductions they're allowed," he asked. "Did you know the bill increases significantly the deduction married couples now get?

"By looking only at some of the worst-case scenarios -- the unintended consequences of this sweeping piece of legislation -- we're overlooking the positive impact it will have, specifically on Southwest Georgia."

Even highly publicized complaints about the cost for car leases under HB 386 are premature, Rynders said.

"That's one of those unintended consequences I'm talking about," the House District 152 representative said. "And it's being addressed as we speak. This thing is like steering a ship. We have to adjust until we get it right, but we've got to get it on its path before we can adjust."

Rynders said even the provision of HB 386 that calls for those moving into the state to pay a 6.5 percent tax on the value of their vehicles before they're given a state title is a provision that will be addressed by the Legislature.

"There are a lot of good things in this bill," he said. "In addition to the energy tax, the Thrush situation and the marriage deductions, counties have been guaranteed under the provisions of the bill that they won't lose money. I'd say it's got quite a lot going for it."

Local economic developers say there is definitely plenty of upside to the legislation.

"As a whole, HB 386 is a huge step forward," Albany-Dougherty Economic Development Commission Director Ted Clem said. "It's a comprehensive tax bill that is a step forward for Georgia. There are a lot of good things in this bill, and from everything I've heard our legislators are working now to tweak and improve it."

Former state Sen. Michael Meyer von Bremen, who currently serves as chairman of the Albany Area Chamber of Commerce's Legislative Affairs Committee, said he's confident the Legislature will work to eliminate unintended consequences that could result from the bill as it is currently written.

"I think the issue with leasing vehicles could negatively impact the state from an economic development standpoint, especially when you consider companies that have large fleets of vehicles," Meyer von Bremen said. "I don't know if that's a make-or-break issue, but it could be a factor that, when taken with others, might lead businesses to reconsider (locating in Georgia).

"But these consequences arise around this kind of legislation. I'm pleased to know that the House has already started taking up this issue. I'm certain they did not intend for (HB 386) to have any kind of negative impact on our economy."

Comments

FryarTuk 1 year, 8 months ago

In spite of the select businesses benefiting from the law it is a business killer. Rynders can chew his political cud all he pleases. There are so many things that have to be addressed in the law it should never have been written and signed into law. Yes get some body from the very successful Albany-Dougherty Economic Development Commission to comment on the laws value. Really, Ted let's see all the businesses you guys are bringing in with the illustrious Chamber of Commerce. Rynders admission of the negative impact the taxes are having and the need for radical improvement is proof enough. There isn't enough lipstick in GA to make that pig presentale. Rynders talks about people reading the entire bill before criticizing it's negative impact, why didn't he read and understand it before he voted for it. It's not rocket science. How in the hell can you write a tax on 25% of the cars on the road and not know it. How can you write a tax on 25% new cars purchase in this state and not know it? It's idiocy in governance or dishonesty. The entire bill sounds very much like the GOP Senators dealing with the hospital bed tax by not calling it a tax and tossing it over to a volunteer commission to handle and take the blame.

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Kay523 1 year, 8 months ago

Sounds like the GOP up to no good. Maybe they can fix this pig before it finishes us.

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rightasrain 1 year, 8 months ago

Constituents need to contact Rynders by email and telephone to express their outrage over this "tax" on used car sales by private citizens. What's next, requiring citizens to pay tax on yard sales, Flea Market sales? I hear that train a comin' unless we take a stand against this invasive and (I hate to say it) unconstitutional over reach of state government; I've made my contacts. We need to let pretty boy Rynders know that they made a BIG mistake by supporting this portion of HB386.

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chinaberry25 1 year, 8 months ago

What exactly is casual automobile sales. And taxed for the first time?? Do you really think we are as stupid as we may sound. The auto sale was taxed and paid for by the first person who owned it. Just like inheritance tax, their parents paid taxes on it when they made the money to begin with. Georgia has to support all these out of wedlock babies being born and they will grow up to vote you out of office. Gonna bite you GOP's in the butt. Has that not dawned on you yet?

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agirl_25 1 year, 8 months ago

Georgia has an estate tax if a person died before 1-1-05, based on federal tax law and has no inheritance tax. Some people got estate tax and inheritance tax confused but the estate tax is paid before the inheritance is distributed. This was my understanding, and the tax law was modified. It had better be that way or I am in deep doo doo....."Georgia does not have a gift tax or an inheritance tax, but it does have an estate tax for estates of decedents with a date of death before January 1, 2005. Georgia does not have a separate estate tax form."

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DoctorDorite 1 year, 8 months ago

Lets not forget that Ga. already has one of the highest tag/tax rates on vehicles in the country. Example, my wifes vehicle tag/tax in Ga. is $475, same vehicle in Fla. is $89, same vehicle in Ala. $85. I'd like to hear Rynders explain those differences in public without stepping on his tongue, All this is due to them bowing to the political squeeze of the Georgia Automobile Dealer Ass.against "casual" sales which hurt them. If you remember all of this happened back in the 90's too !

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FryarTuk 1 year, 8 months ago

Rynders used the analogy of turning a large ship. I will borrow from his example. This law is like a vessel without a rudder and helmsman. Furthermore it is not a large ship it is more like a garbage scow. The law is designed to shift the taxes the large multinational and international corporations are paying to small businesses and middle class.

If the taxes are wrong just pass a law to stop collecting them. They didn't they passed a law to shift the taxes to the people who have no lobbyist in Atlanta. Mark my word, relief will be found for the folks who have money to put in the political pots. It all boils down to the fact that politicians do not serve the people but themselves no matter democarats or republicans.

By the way, I believe in paying taxes. I believe there is a legitimate need for tax revenue and am not what the AH fellow called a "no-tax" radical. The political parties need to stop the gimmicks and manure and tell the people what they are doing. If Gov. Deal can find $200,000 to create a government job for a political hack like defamed ex-senator Chip Rogers there is too much money going to the Gold Dome. When state senators are so intellectually disingenuous (read dishonest) not to call a bed tax a tax and toss it to a volunteer commission to levy and implement, they should not be writing and passing legislation. These are our great civic leaders.

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RedEric 1 year, 8 months ago

If I buy a vehicle for $10,000, recieve a bill of sale and go to the tag office, what do I pay tax on? The bill of sale or some government blue book? If a government blue book, then does this blue book already exist and if so where? Inquiring minds wish to know.

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FryarTuk 1 year, 8 months ago

If it is a transaction between a taxpaying citizen to a taxpaying citizen you will pay on the blue book basis, according to the AH article quoting Denver Hooten DOCO Tax Comm. I don't know if it breaks down into clean, ugly, whosesale, retail categories and which one applies.

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dingleberry 1 year, 8 months ago

Certainly a good question, Fryer. But then how does the state determine the values we are paying tax on now? I would think government would make out like a bandit when a "poor" vehicle gets taxed at any of the four higher condition values, as it likely happens now too. You can expect the rates to go up on the transactions. .

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TrixibelleBento 1 year, 8 months ago

This is what I didn't get when I read it the first time. I thought that the tax would be on the $10,000. It doesn't really matter what it is that you're buying...you could be buying a mule, as long as both parties agree. If an idiot wants to sell you an 2012 Escalade for $2,500, then that's what you should be paying taxes on....I guess the government can't trust us. You'd have someone giving you a Bill of Sale for $2,500 to file with the tax office, when actually you paid $10,000, so I guess I can see the logic. Doesn't make anything better though.

I'm glad I just buy new cars, mostly for the warranty coverage. It alleviates the hassle.

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whattheheck 1 year, 8 months ago

Let's try another "knee jerk" by one of the "radicals" who is still dumb enough to pay for the paper. Didn't we read a few months ago that the energy tax was removed by the state unless the counties wanted to continue it? And didn't we read that DoCo voted to continue the tax? Perhaps I am again confused by either my memory or by poor reporting. But if I am correct, what did the locals get out of this legislation that is touted as improving the economy?

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dingleberry 1 year, 8 months ago

I certainly feel better when the politicians, cheerleaders, and Carlton Fletcher team up to tell us something created by government is "good for us". Now there is no need to search for the truth because we have it and have been set free.

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FryarTuk 1 year, 8 months ago

For the radical "taxem" crowd, whose reaction to recent media information about House Bill 386 and its impact on small businesses and taxpayers in the state has resulted in typical knee-jerk commentary be al local legislator and reporter, an area business owner and taxpayer has a suggestion:

PSST, PSST, (sotto voce) Hey, Rynders read the bill before you vote, dummy.

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Happy 1 year, 8 months ago

It sounds like it is time to use the power of the ballot box and send a message to Atlanta.

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dingleberry 1 year, 8 months ago

Past time. Perhaps as we did on the TSPLOST.

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Merlin 1 year, 8 months ago

I thought Rynders was a Republican.

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rightasrain 1 year, 8 months ago

They (Rynders and his cronies at the Statehouse; or should we now call it "The Big House", say doing away with the Birthday Tax will save the citizen in the "long run" and paying 6.5% on the value of that privately bought auto (state's evaluation) will save the citizen money in the "Long run"; I want to know how long is the "long run" and what guarantee do we have they won't increase the tag fee? I urge everyone to contact Rep. Rynders by phone or email; he's very touchy about this! Vote'm out, I say!!

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FlunkyMonkey 1 year, 8 months ago

After reading this, why do I feel like I have been screwed,,,again?

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Jacob 1 year, 8 months ago

Did Ed send you some flowers, or at least a sweet phone call?

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