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Outlook 2013: Albany Tech poised to offer associate of science in nursing in fall

Albany Technical College Dean of Health Care Technology Mattie Buchannon, right, and ATC Nursing Program Chari Schvon Bussey are excited that the college will be launching a new Associates of Science degree in nursing program during the fall 2013 semester. (Outlook 2013)

Albany Technical College Dean of Health Care Technology Mattie Buchannon, right, and ATC Nursing Program Chari Schvon Bussey are excited that the college will be launching a new Associates of Science degree in nursing program during the fall 2013 semester. (Outlook 2013)

ALBANY, Ga. — Emphasizing the country’s attention to evolving careers in a rapidly burgeoning health care industry, Albany State University, Darton State College and Albany Technical College are all looking to fill community needs.

Albany Tech is gearing up to offer an Associate of Science in Nursing degree, Albany State is exploring a potential health care professions partnership with Georgia Regents University, and Darton has just put together its first BSN in Nursing class.

Albany Tech has been given provisional approval by the Georgia Board of Nursing to begin accepting students into its new Associate of Science Nursing program for the fall semester.

“There has been a tremendous response from the community wanting to get information on the admissions/entrance requirements,” said Mattie Buchannon, Dean of the Health Care Technology division at Albany Technical College. “Our program is designed to assist those interested persons to pursue their goals of becoming a Registered Nurse. We built our program based on some of the successful models that we have seen, while not destroying the goals of any entity in our region.”

“We are excited to help alleviate the nursing shortage and health disparities in our community by providing well-trained registered nurses,” said Schvon Bussey, Program Chair for the new program at Albany Tech.

At Albany State, the GRU College of Allied Health Sciences and the College of Sciences & Health Professions at ASU will collaborate with a goal of producing more diverse physician assistants to serve Georgia residents.

As a first step, officials from both universities will work together to further explore plans to expand educational opportunities for students in Southwest Georgia.

“As the state’s academic medical center, we are committed to the expansion of health professions education and workforce development for the state of Georgia,” said GRU President Ricardo Azziz. “The potential of this type of relationship would allow us to leverage our combined academic and clinical resources to produce more health professionals for the region and better serve the citizens of Southwest Georgia.”

ASU President Everette Freeman was excited about the possible partnership.

“This relationship brings great potential to expand our academic portfolio, to produce better trained African-American physician assistants for our city and for our state,” said Freeman. “As one of the nation’s historically black institutions, my hope is that this collaboration may, someday assist in the creation of a more diverse workforce for Georgia and a better experience for our students.”

Albany is also headquarters for the Georgia Regents University, Medical College of Georgia Southwest Campus satellite medical campus, which provides residency training for third- and fourth-year medical students in partnership with Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital.

At Darton, its first RN to BSN Completion program is well underway. The program is designed as a three semester online/hybrid planned to expand on the Associate degree curriculum preparing the BSN graduate for roles across the life continuum to include leadership, health promotion, disease prevention, community

Graduates of the RN to BSN Completion program will have already successfully completed the NCLEX and obtained state licensure within the first semester of BSN coursework.

Comments

FryarTuk 1 year, 6 months ago

ATC's ASN to RN is really a great idea. It would be even more valuable if it could dovetail into a BSN from say DC or ASU. Look at the possiblities for a student who can earn a good living while nailing down a BSN even if it takes a bit longer. The DC program looks great but on line nursing education takes away from the usually excellent hands on experience particularly for three semesters. Nurses are the best link in medical care and should have been the linchpin in a national health program as opposed to what resulted (IMO).

The PA program at ASU looks exciting particularly if it can be successully attached to GRU MC.

AH writes: " . . .ASU will collaborate with a goal of producing more diverse physician assistants . . ." What does more diverse PA's mean?

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