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Florida python hunt opens with 11 snakes killed

A Burmese python is displayed at the kick-off ceremonies in Davie, Fla., Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013 for the 2013 "Python Challenge" organized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Nearly 800 people have signed up to hunt Burmese pythons on public lands in Florida. Experts say the invasive species is decimating native wildlife in the Florida Everglades. For the first time, the public is joining licensed hunters in the search for the snakes.

A Burmese python is displayed at the kick-off ceremonies in Davie, Fla., Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013 for the 2013 "Python Challenge" organized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Nearly 800 people have signed up to hunt Burmese pythons on public lands in Florida. Experts say the invasive species is decimating native wildlife in the Florida Everglades. For the first time, the public is joining licensed hunters in the search for the snakes.

MIAMI — Florida wildlife officials say 11 Burmese pythons were killed during the first three days of a public hunt for the invasive species in the Everglades.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission says more than 1,000 people from more than 30 states have registered to compete in the monthlong "Python Challenge."

The pythons killed since the competition began Saturday will be processed by the University of Florida. Officials say they hope the large number of hunters will help researchers gather more information about the snakes' habits.

It's unknown how many pythons live in the Everglades. Researchers say the large snakes menace native wildlife in the struggling ecosystem.

Florida law prohibits possession or sale of the pythons for use as pets.

The competition ends Feb. 10.

Comments

GOBEME 1 year, 9 months ago

What about the snakes in Washington that are killing our country?

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chinaberry25 1 year, 9 months ago

Eleven is hardly worth the effort. They never found Sunshine in Albany did they?

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waltspecht 1 year, 9 months ago

Any that they remove are worth the effort. I still think a decent bounty is the way to go, with higher bounty paid for females. Although they felt that many owners would turn in their pets for enough money.

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Oldguy 1 year, 9 months ago

chinaberry25, If you are talking about the escape from the Tift Park Zoo. I believe that was an anaconda. Not certain as it happened many years ago. I believe that they found the babies but do not remember if mother was found. Perhaps someone with a better memory can tell us about it.

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Shinedownfan 1 year, 9 months ago

I bet the Gator Boys would be upset.

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ustaknow 1 year, 9 months ago

Pythons, Asian carp and Kudzu the cure for world hunger

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FryarTuk 1 year, 9 months ago

You wouldn't want to eat the pythons from the Everglades, too much mercury.

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agirl_25 1 year, 9 months ago

I was going to ask what they do with the snakes....if they ate them. I notice in the article it said the University of Florida would "process" them but didn't know what they meant by process.

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