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Rain still predicted, but flooding chances low

The Radium Springs Garden sign is reflected in standing water not far from the parking area of the park Wednesday. Heavy rains forecasted for the area through Friday are forcing public works officials to stay busy pushing water through the area.

The Radium Springs Garden sign is reflected in standing water not far from the parking area of the park Wednesday. Heavy rains forecasted for the area through Friday are forcing public works officials to stay busy pushing water through the area.

ALBANY, Ga. -- It appears that the metro Albany area may have dodged a meteorological bullet.

Initial predictions of up to 3 inches of rain throughout the area over the next 48 hours may fall short, weather officials say, as the system bringing the high levels of moisture veers more to the northwest than originally expected.

"We'll still get rain, it's just the people I've talked to at the weather service don't think we'll see as much as they originally thought," Deputy Emergency Management Director Jim Vaught said Wednesday.

Already soggy conditions had caused some local officials to be concerned about localized flooding in some areas if the 3 or more inches of rain predicted did end up falling on the area.

But Wednesday, Public Works crews for both the city of Albany and Dougherty County were monitoring holding ponds and drainage ditches, keeping water moving as much as possible to keep low-lying neighborhoods dry.

"Right now I don't think it'll be a problem," EMA Director and Fire Chief James Carswell said. "Public works is out trying to get the water in the ponds moving as best as they can, but we should be OK."

Sandbags were being offered as a precaution for those who live in low-lying areas.

If there is any flooding, it likely would come due in part to an already oversaturated ground surface that has seen several inches of rain already this week.

At Radium Gardens, water was pooling near the parking area of the park, but the area around the spring remained several feet below the point where water would cover the nearby walkways.

As for the rivers and the creeks, many have already started receding for the week.

The Flint in Albany was at 6 feet Wednesday afternoon and is predicted to crest at some point Saturday around 8 feet, well below the 26-foot flood stage.

The Kinchafoonee and Muckalee creeks in Lee County were both receding after topping out around 6 feet Tuesday, Vaught said. Like the Flint, their levels were both well below flood stage.

Rain will still move through the area and has prompted the cancellation of some area Fourth of July celebrations. The festivities in Albany planned at the Exchange Club Fairgrounds, however, are still a go according to Recreation and Parks officials.