0

Albany doctor to appear in PBS documentary

Dr. James Hotz, who was the inspiration for the 1991 Michael J. Fox film "Doc Hollywood," will be one of five physicians to be featured in a documentary that will appear on Georgia Public Broadcasting in April.

Dr. James Hotz, who was the inspiration for the 1991 Michael J. Fox film "Doc Hollywood," will be one of five physicians to be featured in a documentary that will appear on Georgia Public Broadcasting in April.

ALBANY, Ga. -- Dr. James Hotz will soon be able to add a film credit to his resume.

The Albany internist at Albany Area Primary Health Care who was the inspiration for the 1991 Michael J. Fox film "Doc Hollywood" will be one of five physicians to be featured in a documentary that will appear on Georgia Public Broadcasting several times during the month of April.

"Primary Concern" is an hour-long documentary by Renee McKay and Joani Livingston. The film aims to take the audience to the front lines of the looming national health care crisis by more closely examining the lives of primary care practitioners in rural areas of Georgia.

Officials say that Georgia is currently suffering from a dire physician shortage, while at the same time being the ninth most populous state and the fifth fastest growing state in the nation. Without changes in the state's medical education system, it is predicted that Georgia will rank last in the United States in physicians per capita by 2020.

A problem also exists on the national level, as the Association of American Medical Colleges projects that, by 2015, the U.S. will be 63,000 doctors short of the number needed -- a figure officials say could double by 2025.

It's an obstacle compounded by an aging baby boomer population while the medical field's work force is also getting older, the influx of millions of people seeking access to care to be covered by the Affordable Care Act and few medical students going into primary care with not enough residency slots for those who choose that field.

Drs. Jean Sumner, Katy Naymick, Fred Gaton and Ashley Mooney -- all of whom are practicing in north and central Georgia -- will be the others featured in the production.

Attempts to reach Hotz for a statement on Friday were unsuccessful.

The documentary is the latest project to come from Livingston+McKay, a production company based in Gainesville. "Primary Concern" will air at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, midnight on Thursday, 3 a.m. on Saturday, 3 p.m. on April 21 and 10 p.m. on April 24.

A trailer for "Primary Concern" is viewable at http://www.livingstonmckay.com/primary-concern.

Comments

800poundgorilla 1 year, 5 months ago

This is the Dr. Hotz who accused Dr. John Bagnato and Charles Rehberg of burglary and assault? The one who sued Dr. Grace Davis for practicing rural medicine?

0

FryarTuk 1 year, 5 months ago

Dr. Hotz is an excellent physician! Cornell, Ohio State & Emory, he's got one hell of a medical pedigree to be in SoWeGa. All four of his children are in medical school at varying levels and his wife teaches at a local EMT training program at one of the colleges. One might say he is certainly doing his part to fill the needs. (Lol)

0

Sign in to comment