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State releases first College and Career Ready Performance Index Results

The new accountability system replaces the No Child Left Behind's much-maligned AYP standard.

A graphic of school scores of the CCRPI. Click to enlarge.

A graphic of school scores of the CCRPI. Click to enlarge.

ALBANY, Ga. — Just six of Dougherty County's 26 schools performed at or above the state average in the Georgia Department of Education first Georgia College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI) released on Tuesday.

The new CCRPI measures schools and school districts on an easy-to-understand 100 point scale.

The CCRPI is the new accountability system that replaces the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) measurement in Georgia. The U.S. Department of Education granted Georgia's waiver from NCLB in February.

Dougherty County received a scores of 68.2 for elementary schools, 72 for middle schools, and 57.4 for high schools.

The state average for elementary schools was 83.4; middle school was 81.4 and high schools was 72.6.

The Lee County School System averaged 81.9 for elementary schools, 85 for middle schools and 78.3 for Lee County High.

Among DCSS elementary schools, the scores ranged from 92.3 at Lincoln Magnet to 45.1 at Jackson Heights. Among middle schools the scores ranged from a system high 95 at Robert Cross Middle Magnet to 55.9 at Albany Middle. Among high schools, Westover led the way at 68; Albany scored 55.4; Monroe weighed in with 52.3 and Dougherty scored 50.7.

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A graphic of school scores of the CCRPI. Click to enlarge.

"The Dougherty County School System will use the data reported today to help students achieve at higher levels," Interim Superintendent Butch Mosely said. "I have said since coming on board that higher student performance comes with having the right teachers in the classrooms and having the right leadership for the schools. We are working hard to ensure that those key people are in place in our system. We are also taking advantage of opportunities to drive school improvement with the support of Race to the Top and School Improvement Grants.

"It will take a little time, but new district leadership and initiatives, already approved by our Board of Education, will help us turn around low achieving schools."

CCRPI SCORES FOR METRO ALBANY SCHOOLS

District Elem. Middle High

Baker 56.6 66.6 52.1

Calhoun 75.2 88.8 71.9

Dougherty 68.2 72 57.4

Lee 81.9 85 78.3

Mitchell 68.1 82.6 84.8

Terrell 68.1 69 60.6

Worth 69.9 71.8 66.3

The CCRPI includes scores that easily communicate to the public how a school is doing. Each school receives a score out of 100 points, just like what students receive in their classes.

A school and district's overall score, is made up of three major areas: Achievement (70 points possible), Progress (15 points possible) and Achievement Gap (15 points possible). Dougherty County received system scores of 68.2 for elementary grades, 72 for middle, and 57.4 for high schools for this 2012 benchmark year.

In addition to the three major areas, some schools receive "Challenge Points" to add to their score (up to 10 points). They receive these points if they have a significant number of Economically Disadvantaged students, English Learner students and Students with Disabilities meeting expectations.

Systems also receive points for going beyond the targets of the CCRPI by challenging students to exceed expectations and participate in college and career readiness programs. Beginning in the 2013-2014 school year, schools will also receive ratings based on their financial efficiency and school climate, but these ratings will be for the public's information only and will not factor into the school's overall CCRPI score.

"Changes in Georgia student testing, new common curriculum, and changes in the accountability measures for schools coming into effect this year are bringing reports that may be very alarming to parents and our community," said Ufot Inyang, assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction. "Because of these new measures and methods of data collection there may be 20 to 40 point drops in academic performance reports in some areas this year."

DCSS officials pointed out that these drops are not going to be exclusive to the Dougherty County School System but will carry a similar impact across the state.

The data used to compute academic success for schools has undergone significant changes since last reported by the state department of education.

The methodology for the release of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) reports is no longer used, although the tests used for that measure are still incorporated in the new calculations.

"We recognize that we have a lot of work to do to improve academic performance across the board," Inyang said, "and we are preparing teachers for improved instruction in line with the rigor associated with the Common Core Performance Standards."

State School Superintendent John Barge praised the new standard, saying it is much more effective in measuring student progress than the old AYP measure.

"I am very pleased that we now have a school improvement measure as in-depth as the College and Career Ready Performance Index," Barge said. "We are no longer bound by the narrow definitions of success found in the Adequate Yearly Progress measurement. Holding schools accountable and rewarding them for the work they do in all subjects and with all students is critical in preparing our students to be college and career ready.

"The index effectively measures how schools prepare our students for success."

Comments

waltspecht 11 months, 2 weeks ago

Will this generate more Parent Flight to Lee?

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MRKIA 11 months, 2 weeks ago

NO MATTER HOW YOU CALCULATE IT THERE ARE TOO MANY STUDENTS AND GRADUATES DUMBER THAN A BOX OF ROCKS. NO DISRESPECT TO THE ROCKS.

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FryarTuk 11 months, 2 weeks ago

CCRPI - Interesting. I'm sure there is more substance to this evaluation concept than is reported in the story due to limitations of time and space. I would like to understand the academic performance indexes that are incorporated. A lot of generalities but not much meat other than to indicate a heck of a disparity between DCSS and the state's average numbers whatever that means.

Mosley: " I have said since coming on board that higher student performance comes with having the right teachers in the classrooms and having the right leadership for the schools. " Is this the 3% he was talking about? This is going to be a long arduous undertaking.

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chinaberry25 11 months, 2 weeks ago

I do not know whether you know it or not, but Dougherty County has the right to merge with Lee County. All it would take was for the voters to do so. Lee Co could do nothing. This might not be a bad thing if you took Lee Co. administrators and placed them in DCSS. They seem to know what they are doing. Georgia has too many counties anyway.

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dingleberry 11 months, 2 weeks ago

Talk about a Hindenburg-sized lead balloon! To avoid an epic pitched battle, why not try to get the pathetic voters in Dougherty to try and underwhelm Mitchell, a system in a "poor" county posting some surprising numbers?

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MRKIA 11 months, 2 weeks ago

NOW WAIT A MINUTE, LEAVE MITCHELL CO. ALONE. LET THEM ANNEX TERRELL OR BAKER CO. MITCHELL CO IS A BRIGHT SPOT IN S.W. GA.

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dingleberry 11 months, 1 week ago

The numbers support your comment, MRKIA . But I don't think even DoCo would be interested in Baker or Terrell! lol

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OUTsiderLookingINalbany 11 months, 2 weeks ago

If you merge DCSS with Lee Co. then the same thing will happen that has happened the last few decades; good families will leave to find better learning enviroments for their children. What responsible parent wants their kids to go to a school where failure is the norm? This problem will not be solved simply by merging the good with the bad.

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Ihope4albany 11 months, 2 weeks ago

I hope that the State comes down and hold a mandatory meeting for the parents and the community. Too much blame is put on the teachers and administrators. However if the children come unprepared to school beginning in pre-k, they are behind the whole way. Not only that, too many children lack discipline and respect for teachers, peers, and the classroom overall.

There was a breakdown in society a long time ago that this country is still running from. Yet, society keeps reaping too many negative consequences.

Yes, even more parents will leave Dougherty to go to Lee. When too many (blacks) get to Lee County-- watch what happens. Lee whites will gradually begin moving back to Dougherty. It is a sad shell game.

Because of economics and not race, groups of people only want to associate with those same people. It happens that whites in this country are the dominate group. We can look at other societies and find the same setup when you have all whites or all one culture; they use some other social factor to discriminate against one another.

Humanity is doomed without the saving grace of a higher being.

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RedEric 11 months, 2 weeks ago

BS, Ihope, teachers are members of a profession. It is not just a job they are doing. As professionals they are expected to accomplish their professional objectives. Those objectives are they send complete students on to the next level (grade). Students who are sent on without fully accomplishing the objectives for that class is a failure by the teachers. Administration gives teachers the means, but they must teach. They must find a way, no excuses.

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FryarTuk 11 months, 2 weeks ago

I agree in large part with what you say but Mosley's comment " . . . student performance comes with having the right teachers in the classrooms and having the right leadership for the schools" is critically true. While I do not question the good intention of the teachers a huge part of them are not prepared. It's not just a single factor but Mosley is right here. BTW the AJC has an article on line ("Georgia releases grades for schools, districts") that complements Lewis' report, wasn't substantively different just more discussion about the rating method that was helpful to me.

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Sister_Ruby_Two 11 months, 1 week ago

You know you crazey, ihope!

You stays in that "Black Liberation Theology" era of 150 years ago with no answers other than 150 year-old answers! Where do you teach your course?

But don't expect a rational answer from ihope! NO! He/She just come on here and dump a load and head back to class, teaching that bullcrap to unsuspecting, open minds who lap it up like cat's milk.

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oldster 11 months, 2 weeks ago

My grandson will graduate with honors from Lee Co. HS this month. The four years he spent at Lee Co. HS have been outstanding, he has enjoyed it immensely. I dare say had the family stayed in Albany and he went to any of the schools in DCSS things would have turned out differently. I hope they are able to continue to properly manage the school system so that Lee Co. HS an enjoyable, and rewarding experience for future students. I also hope that the DCSS will improve the order, discipline, and test scores so that people will want to send their kids there.

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dingleberry 11 months, 2 weeks ago

Things are looking better in DCSS but not so bright we have to wear shades. What we are seeing now is a temporary situation where a super does not have to try and win friends while pleasing people. As a temp, he can kick pukey without much backlash since the limbo bar is at ground level. But when his tenure is up, will we go back to a search for replacement better than #34, like #33 or #32? , Or will we have the 'nads to pick one with real qualifications who is not a product of ASU or Nova University?

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agirl_25 11 months, 1 week ago

That would be very sad if the Board did pick another winner hahaahahahaha...like Murfree. Too bad the Board gets to pick the Super and not a parental board who happen to know what is best for their children. Often times Board members have too many backs to scratch and too many secrets to keep, or have kept...wink wink....As I said before, I am so glad I don't have children in the DCSS. Yes, dingleberry, it would be nice if the board could collectively have one set of brass ones....and to stay away from the likes of what they had before. Also, I suggest they do a thorough check of the candidates credentials so as to not get another Murfree, who I still don't think was honest on his application. Doh, how dumb of me...to even suggest the Board even looked at his qualifications.

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MRKIA 11 months, 1 week ago

YOU'RE TALKING ABOUT SOME OF THE SAME IDIOT PARENTS ON A BOARD THAT ELECTED JUNEBUG, VELVET ET AL.

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OUTsiderLookingINalbany 11 months, 2 weeks ago

To much blame on the teachers. Although I believe that the teachers do play an important role, homework is just as important! Parents and students do not want to be held accountable for their short comings. A minimum of two hours a day should be devoted to the lessons taught at school that day. Two hours is nothing compared to what is needed in college. No matter how much money you throw at this problem, nothing will change until you get the parents and students more involved. It is a culture thing as well. If I was a teacher, I would NEVER want to teach in an enviroment like the ones found in DCSS.

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Sister_Ruby_Two 11 months, 1 week ago

"Stand back folks........nothing to see here........"

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Sister_Ruby_Two 11 months, 1 week ago

"Much-maligned" because it was politicized by people who Hate Bush.

ANY standard, new or old, that exacts accountability and results from Teachers will meet the same fate.

If not.........then there must not be any substance to the so-called new "Standard".

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