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10th annual Water Festival wraps up

Frank Yancey, a district conservationist from the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, makes a presentation on agricultural water use to a group of students from Carver Elementary School in Dawson on Thursday during the 10th Annual Water Festival at the Flint RiverQuarium. (Staff Photo by Terry Lewis)

Frank Yancey, a district conservationist from the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, makes a presentation on agricultural water use to a group of students from Carver Elementary School in Dawson on Thursday during the 10th Annual Water Festival at the Flint RiverQuarium. (Staff Photo by Terry Lewis)

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Jeanie Brown, a retired volunteer from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, makes a presentation on the sources and importance of running water to a group of students from Deerfield-Windsor School on Thursday during the 10th Annual Water Festival at the Flint RiverQuarium. (Staff Photo by Terry Lewis)

ALBANY — The 10th Annual Regional Water Festival continued toward its finale Thursday at the Flint RiverQuarium. Festival officials said more than 900 fourth and fifth graders from Dougherty, Terrell, Webster and Randolph counties participated in the three-day event, which began Tuesday.

The festival’s goal was to provide a fun-filled educational opportunity for area students to learn, appreciate and explore the many uses of water.

There were nine educational presentation areas at the festival:

— Oil & Water Don’t Mix

— Non-Point Source Pollution

— Mosquito Control

— Hand Washing Saves Lives

— Agricultural Water Use

— Weather and You

— Water in Wetlands

— Watersmart

— Water and Soil Erosion

— Running Water

“This is a wonderful opportunity for our students to gain a better understanding of water conservation so they can contribute later,” Deerfield-Windsor School science teacher Christy Eakes, who brought 48 students to the festival, said. “Some of these kids have never thought about water conservation before.”

Eakes added that the presentation areas are all being taught in schools.

“We have talked about all of these topics and it’s nice to see them covered here,” Eakes said. “This trip is really all about education and awareness.”

A floor below, Tiffany Burks, a science teacher from Carver Elementary in Dawson, sat behind her group of students who were learning about agricultural water use from Frank Yancey of the USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Center.

“I hope my students will be able to relate to these real world experience when I am teaching,” Burks said. “All these presentations are connections for our textbooks. But you can’t learn everything from a textbook. Science is all around us and hands-on experiences like these are important.”

Burks said that more than 90 students from Terrell County made the trip.

The festival was organized by Keep Albany-Dougherty Beautiful, Georgia Water Planning and Policy Center and The Flint RiverQuarium.