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State School Board approves Mosely waiver

The State Board of Education on Thursday granted the Dougherty County School System’s contract waiver request which will allow Interim Superintendent Butch Mosely to remain with the district until June 30 of next year.

The State Board of Education on Thursday granted the Dougherty County School System’s contract waiver request which will allow Interim Superintendent Butch Mosely to remain with the district until June 30 of next year.

ATLANTA — The State Board of Education on Thursday unanimously approved a consent agenda which included a waiver request from the Dougherty CountySchool Board in regard to the contract status of Interim Superintendent Butch Mosely.

The approval means that Mosely will be able to serve as superintendent until June 30, 2014, instead of having to suspend his TRS (Teacher Retirement system of Georgia) pension and having the DCSS rework his contract.

“I’ll be honest, I’m glad it’s over. It’s what I wanted personally and I think it’s good for the Dougherty County School System,” Mosely said from outside the board room shortly after the deciding vote.

Asked if he thought the community played a part in the granting of the waiver, Mosley replied, “absolutely. I’d hate to name all the people who helped, but (State BOE member) Elizabeth Ragsdale went the extra mile for us and (DCSS attorney) Tommy Coleman played a huge role. We also had help from our state legislators, letters from community leaders and a whole lot of phone calls. I am very appreciative of all of the help.

“Now it’s time to come back home and get to work.”

DCSS BOE Chair Carol Tharin, who was also at the meeting, was delighted with the state’s decision.

“We’re all pretty high right now,” Tharin said. “It means we can continue to more forward with the job we started in January, and that is to put the Dougherty County School System back on track to be one of the best school systems in the state. I’d like to thank everyone involved in helping secure this waiver because it took collaborative effort from a lot of different people.”

Earlier this year, Georgia passed HB 208, which sets strict return to work provisions and limits the number of hours a member of the Teacher’s Retirement System of Georgia (TRS) can work.

Mosely was retired from the state when he began work as the DCSS’s Interim Superintendent in January.

According to the TRS web site, members who have negotiated a return to work employment contract have been notified that, “retirees who are currently under an employment which extends beyond June 30, 2013, will be required to terminate or suspend their TRS retirement benefit.”

Mosely currently draws $154,000 per year from the TRS, and his original one-year deal with the DCSS pays him $175,000 annually with no benefits.

The law, which applies retroactively, states that retirees can work no longer than nine months per year. Mosley’s maximum would have been reached on Sept. 30.