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Herald "thinks pink" for cancer

ALBANY — You may have noticed something different about today’s edition of The Albany Herald — it’s pink.

For the fourth year, the Herald has chosen one issue to print on pink paper in support of national Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The Herald website, www.albanyherald.com features a pink background today as well.

“We usually print this special edition on a Thursday, but we’ve chosen Monday this year, to coincide with our recent launch of “Medical Monday, said Herald General Sales Manager Ken Boler. “Medical Monday” is our weekly edition in which we provide our readers with doctor profiles, feature stories, health tips and local options available for them in this area.”

“We want to help our readers with a variety of issues, including diabetes, obesity and, in light of recent events, proper hydration,” Boler said.

“Our intent is to provide our readers with a source for early prevention and show them how they can get care. During the month of October, we want to help bring breast cancer awareness to the forefront,” he added.

Cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in women after lung cancer. The chance that breast cancer will be responsible for a woman’s death is about 1 in 36 and the chance of developing invasive breast cancer at some time in a woman’s life is a little less than 1 in 8. According to the American Cancer Society, a 20-year-old woman today has one chance in 1,681 of being diagnosed with a breast tumor within the next 10 years, while that probability goes up to one in 232 for a 30-year-old woman and one in 42 for a 50-year-old woman for the same 10-year period.

Early detection has long been recommended by medical professionals as one of the most effective combatants against this disease. The American Cancer Society’s guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer vary depending on a woman’s age, with methods of detection including mammography and clinical breast examination. For women who have high risk factors, the organization also recommends a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

The American Cancer Society suggests that women in their 20s get clinical breast exams at least every three years, with the frequency increasing to annually for asymptomatic women in their 40s. The Society recommends that a woman start having an annual mammogram once she turns 40.

“If seeing the pink stock of Monday’s paper or the pink background on the albanyherald.com website reminds one of our reader to call her doctor and set up a screening that she’s been putting off, then the pink paper has done its job. The earlier that this cancer is spotted, the better,” Albany Herald Editor Jim Hendricks said.

For more information, visit the American Cancer Society website at www.cancer.org, or contact Albany’s local office at 229- 446-1073.