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Tea at Two benefit set for Saturday

Tea at Two is a first-time event to benefit the SOWEGA Council on Aging

From left are Jackie Smith, SOWEGA Council on Aging Assistant Director Debbie Blanton, and Christiana Smith. Tickets are available for Tea at Two, which will be Saturday at the SOWEGA Council on Aging. (Staff photo: Laura Williams)

From left are Jackie Smith, SOWEGA Council on Aging Assistant Director Debbie Blanton, and Christiana Smith. Tickets are available for Tea at Two, which will be Saturday at the SOWEGA Council on Aging. (Staff photo: Laura Williams)

ALBANY — Just in time for Mother’s Day, Albany’s Water, Gas & Light Commission and the SOWEGA Council on Aging will sponsors a day that’s just for women.

“Tea at Two” is scheduled for 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Saturday at the SOWEGA Council on Aging’s Senior Enrichment Center, 335 W. Society Ave.

Why Seniors Are Important

I believe that Seniors play an important role in the community. They're the ones who help pull the community together. They're the wise ones, who help us through life's problems. They're the ones who are about us when no one else does, and if one still think no body cares, try missing a couple of car payments.

This world just wouldn't be right without Seniors. There would be no Grandparent's Day, grandma's cooking, or fishing with granddaddy. This is what brings families together.

Seniors are the ones who encourage young children to get out and be involved in the community. Seniors are fun people to hang out with. We would't be here without them.

If you really take time and is it with Seniors, you'll see things from a different perspective. They get really lonely often, so take time and tell them "hey." They'll be so happy.

Remember, God loves us, and he made us all, so always show kindness to everyone, especially our Super Seniors.

- Christiana Smith

“This is the first time we’ve had an event like this,” said Lorie Farkas, WG&L assistant general manager of customer relations and marketing. “We’re hoping to make it an annual event.”

As in the Southern days of old, ladies of all ages — mothers, grandmothers, daughters, nieces, and friends — can take a much-needed break for a couple of hours and enjoy fellowship, food, and fashion.

“We only have one rule,” said SOWEGA Council on Aging Assistant Director Debbie Blanton, “no men allowed!”

Attendees are encouraged to have fun with the occasion, dressing in their Sunday best, hats and all.

“This is what ladies used to do in the South,” said Farkas. “They would come together for the afternoon and just enjoy each other’s company.

“We want to try and blur the lines between ages by making this a wonderful, collaborative effort. We just don’t do that enough anymore.”

One young lady who is trying to do just that is Christiana Smith, a 12-year-old Albany resident who knows exactly how wise and inspiring older generations can be.

“I have a lot of people in my life who influence me, and they all have such a great effect of my life,” Smith said.

Smith wrote about her feelings in a personal essay entitled, “Why Seniors Are Important.” In the composition, she noted, “They’re the ones who help pull the community together. They’re the wise ones that help us through life’s problems. They’re the ones who care about use when nobody else does.”

The afternoon tea will feature two fashion shows from local shops Sweet Potatoes and The Royal Collection, and Turner Job Corps is providing food for the event.

The Red Queeen from “Alice in Wonderland” will make a special appearance, as well as a variety of Disney princesses. A photographer will be in attendance taking free photos of the magical encounters for attendees to take home at the end of the day.

Farkas noted, “It’s hard for women to find time for themselves. Men go out and play golf — and how much does one round cost?

“But for less than that, ladies can come and really enjoy a lovely afternoon that’s just for them.”

Ticket for the event are $10, and should be bought by Wednesday. They are available for purchase at the SOWEGA Council on Aging or by calling (229) 432-1124 or (229) 432-1124.