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Albany Civil Rights Institute Executive Director Frank Wilson proposes a partnership with regional educational institutions

The proposal would teach students about the Albany and Southwest Georgia Movement while helping the museum build traffic

Albany Civil Rights Institute Executive Director Frank Wilson proposed a partnership Wednesday with representatives from eight regional educational institutions where the ACRI would help teach visiting students about the Albany and Southwest Georgia Civil Rights movement while helping the museum build traffic. (Staff Photo: Terry Lewis)

Albany Civil Rights Institute Executive Director Frank Wilson proposed a partnership Wednesday with representatives from eight regional educational institutions where the ACRI would help teach visiting students about the Albany and Southwest Georgia Civil Rights movement while helping the museum build traffic. (Staff Photo: Terry Lewis)

ALBANY — As part of his job, Albany Civil Rights Institute Executive Director Frank Wilson feels compelled to teach today’s youth about the rich history of the Albany and Southwest Georgia Civil Rights movement of the 60s.

Wilson and the ACRI took a step toward that ambition Wednesday by inviting representatives of several regional educational institutions for a good old-fashioned sales pitch.

“I am always amazed that many of our students have no idea of the civil rights history in this area,” Wilson said. “What we are attempting to do today is to create partnerships with area schools in an effort to teach this history.”

Representatives from Albany State University, South Georgia State College, Valdosta State University, Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, Andrew College, Darton State College, Albany Technical College, Monroe High School, and the Albany-Dougherty Convention and Visitors Bureau were on hand for Wilson’s presentation.

Wilson proposed that the ACRI and educational institutions partner to allow students to swipe their student IDs for admission to the museum, and the ACRI would then send each school a monthly bill which would be paid out of student fees.

“Basically this makes good walking around sense. The students would learn about the civil rights struggle in Southwest Georgia and the museum would build traffic,” Wilson said. “This is why we are reaching out today; we just wanted to get the process started.”

According to the ACRI’s web site, “The Albany Civil Rights Institute allows visitors to experience the civil rights movement in southwest Georgia like never before. The legacy of those who have passed on and the stories of those who remain are now housed in a state-of-the-art facility where the past is joined with the future through visual, audio, and digital technology for all to see, hear and experience.”