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Dougherty School Board OKs grade-changing settlement between Kevin Fretwell and the district

Kevin Fretwell has agreed to be reassigned for the remainder of the term and will resign at the end of the school year

The Dougherty County School Board on Wednesday approved an agreement between Westover high school teacher and coach Kevin Fretwell and the school system in regard to his admitted disclosure last month of a grade changing incident, which involved 122 freshmen at the school. (File Photo)

The Dougherty County School Board on Wednesday approved an agreement between Westover high school teacher and coach Kevin Fretwell and the school system in regard to his admitted disclosure last month of a grade changing incident, which involved 122 freshmen at the school. (File Photo)

ALBANY — The Dougherty County School Board on Wednesday unanimously approved a settlement agreement between the DCSS and Westover teacher and coach Kevin Fretwell, who admitted to releaing student records to The Albany Herald in a recent grade-changing incident at Westover High School.

The agreement includes Fretwell’s immediate reassignment to the South Georgia School of Achievement and his resignation at the end of the school year. He will remain as Westover’s wrestling coach for the remainder of the school year, but has been relieved of his duties as baseball coach.

Fretwell is the last of four Westover High School administrators and teachers to be disciplined as the result of the discovery of 122 student grade changes at the school last month. Westover Principal William Chunn was docked five days of pay, Assistant Principal Brian Collier was issued a letter of reprimand, and teacher Kevin Martin was suspended five days without pay.

Late last month, an internal investigation by Mosely’s office revealed more than 120 first nine-weeks grade changes in six ninth-grade world history classes taught by one teacher. The Herald was given copies of student summary grade reports, all of which were from six periods taught by Martin, a first-year teacher. The Herald has not disclosed its source of the information. Fretwell told school system officials that he was the one who released it.

The reports showed that at least 85 percent of the students’ grades had been changed from a failing mark — one as low as zero — to 70. None of the 122 students had a final first nine-weeks grade lower than 70 recorded, although the documents revealed many students had actually failed the first grading term.

Chunn, in his position as principal, was authorized to make the grade changes, but he failed to include individual grade change orders in the students’ files, which is required by state law.