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Dougherty County School Board approves Title I-A grants

Dougherty BOE sends architectural and maintenance recommendations back to committee

Dougherty County School Board members James Bush, left, Milton “June Bug” Griffin and Darrel Ealum listen to a presentation Monday night during the Board’s regular monthly meeting. (Staff Photo: Terry Lewis)

Dougherty County School Board members James Bush, left, Milton “June Bug” Griffin and Darrel Ealum listen to a presentation Monday night during the Board’s regular monthly meeting. (Staff Photo: Terry Lewis)

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Dougherty County School Board member Robert Youngblood listens to a presentation Monday night during the Board’s regular monthly meeting. (Staff Photo: Terry Lewis)

ALBANY — The Dougherty County School Board held its regular meeting Monday evening and breezed through a light agenda rather quickly.

In addition to approving Interim Superintendent Butch Mosely’s recommendation for employment and release of personnel, the Board also voted to send back to the Buildings and Grounds Committee three recommendations for further study.

The items included recommendations for architectural design and construction administrative services RFQs (Request For Quotes) and bathroom upgrades and other maintenance work for Sylvester Road and the Magnolia Education Center. Sylvester Road is destined to become the new home of Albany Early College when it moves from the campus at Albany State University.

The Board also approved four recommendations from the Finance Committee in regard to two Title I-A grants, the establishment of bank and investment accounts for SPLOST (Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax) funds and a 65 percent waiver request dealing with classroom funding.

The Board was unanimous on all recommendations except the 65 percent waiver, which Darel Ealum voted against.

During a presentation prior to the start of the work session, The board recognized five district schools which had been named to the Georgia Department of Education’s 2013 list of “Highest Progress Reward Schools.”

The schools are Dougherty International Education Middle School; Lamar Reese School of the Arts; Merry Acres Middle school; Sherwood Acres Elementary School and Southside Middle School.

A “High-Progress School” is a Title I school among the 10 percent of Title I schools in the State that is making the most progress in improving the performance of the “all students” group over three years on the statewide assessments. A school may not be classified as a High-Progress School if it has been identified as a Priority, Focus, or Alert School.

The Board’s next meeting will be at its mid-monthly gathering at 11:30 a.m. on Jan. 29

In a side note earlier in the meeting, Boy Scout Troop 8 attended the meeting and was recognized by Mosely, who thanked the group for its attendance. He then asked if they had any questions.

After a brief pause one young man stood up and said, “Yes, sir, I have a question.”

“What is it?” Mosely asked.

“I’d like to know why I got put on ISS (In School Suspension)?”

The room erupted in laughter.

After the room quieted down, Mosely smiled and said, “Step up to the microphone, young man.”

“First off I would like to say I admire your courage for asking that question,” Mosely said. “I’ll tell you what we’re going to do. Give me your name and cell number. We’ll call your principal in the morning and ask why you were put on ISS, then we’ll call you and give you the reason. Fair enough?”

The young man nodded and returned to his seat.

And from the back of the room a voice was heard saying, “Well, at least he asked the right person.”