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Community Night offers guidelines for Albany voters

Albany Civil Rights Institute sponsors voter information

Ginger P. Nickerson, supervisor with the Albany/Dougherty County Office of Voter Registration and Elections, gave a basic overview on voting during Community Night at the Albany Civil Rights Institute Thursday. (Staff Photo: Jim West)

Ginger P. Nickerson, supervisor with the Albany/Dougherty County Office of Voter Registration and Elections, gave a basic overview on voting during Community Night at the Albany Civil Rights Institute Thursday. (Staff Photo: Jim West)

ALBANY — A Community Night program at the Albany Civil Rights Institute, 326 Whitney Ave., featured Ginger P. Nickerson, supervisor with the Albany/Dougherty County Office of Voter Registration and Elections. Nickerson presented a broad view of voting in any Georgia election, as well as some special considerations for college students.

The speaker stressed that while every state has its own specific set of voting rules, to her understanding, Georgia is among the easiest and most liberal states in that regard — even providing free photo ID cards for those those who have no such cards themselves.

According to Nickerson, among the acceptable photo ID cards are a Georgia driver’s license — even if expired — a valid U.S. passport, a valid employee photo ID from any branch or agency of the U.S. government or the state of Georgia, a valid U.S. military photo ID or a valid tribal photo ID.

Nickerson went through the voting basics, including citizenship requirements, precinct registration , absentee ballots and provisional ballots.

“If you come to vote and we have an issue and cannot locate you, Georgia law says we can’t turn anyone around,” Nickerson said. “We definitely can’t tell you you can’t vote, so we offer you a provisional ballot.”

According to Nickerson, there would be three days allowed to locate the would-be voter, for the individual to furnish proper information or identification.

“Either the ballot will count or it won’t count,” Nickerson said.

Nickerson warned of mistakes college students sometimes make — to register at college during a voting drive and then go home to another county and “accidentally”register at the Department of Motor Vehicles while getting their driver’s licenses. In those cases, the information is taken from the license, so when the student tries to vote while back at school, he finds he isn’t registered, Nickerson said.