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Nine area girls attend Girls State in Statesboro

Legion Auxiliary sponsors students in annual event

Attending Girls State in Statesboro recently were Nasya Blackwell, Derricka Calhoun, Jazmine Mace, Jasmyn Fields, Jordan Membhard, Savannah Mullins, Abigail Simmons, Makayla Hoffman and Katherine Jack. (Special Photo)

Attending Girls State in Statesboro recently were Nasya Blackwell, Derricka Calhoun, Jazmine Mace, Jasmyn Fields, Jordan Membhard, Savannah Mullins, Abigail Simmons, Makayla Hoffman and Katherine Jack. (Special Photo)

ALBANY — Nine area rising high school seniors recently represented the American Legion Auxiliary from American Legion Post 30 in Albany at Girls State at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro.

Attending were Nasya Blackwell, Derricka Calhoun, Jazmine Mace, Jasmyn Fields, Jordan Nembhard, Savannah Mullins, Abigail Simmons, Makayla Hoffman and Katherine Jack. Hoffman is from Lowndes County, but the other eight girls are from Dougherty County.

Girls State is a national program of the American Legion Auxiliary and is a course of instruction in, as well as a practical application of, the fundamental principles and procedures of city, county and state government.

Maxine Henderson, Girls State chairperson for American Legion Auxiliary in Albany, said the local delegates did well at the event and were elected to various offices during the training.

Blackwell was elected secretary of state and Calhoun was elected city attorney. Mace plans to become a junior counselor at next year’s event and Fields became a nationalist in the house of representatives. Nembhard became councilwoman in the house of representatives and Mullins was appointed bailiff to the Georgia Board of Regents. Simmons was elected president pro-tem and Hoffman was elected to the board of education. Jackson was elected city councilwoman, county coroner and also wants to be a junior counselor next year.

“As chairperson for Girls State, it is rewarding to hear the responses and stories the girls have to tell upon returning,” said Hancock. “They make such great friends and really come out of their shells and realize how much they can be.”