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Baconton changed little by the Great Flood

Little evidence of the flood now in Baconton

Annette Morman, Baconton mayor, and Anthony Morman, who's with Public Works, say Baconton has changed little since the flood. (Staff Photo: Jim West)

Annette Morman, Baconton mayor, and Anthony Morman, who's with Public Works, say Baconton has changed little since the flood. (Staff Photo: Jim West)

BACONTON — No community goes looking for a flood, but by regional standards tiny Baconton in Mitchell County stayed mostly high and dry during the Flood of ’94 that swamped much of middle and south Georgia.

In fact, its relative elevation may be what saved the town.

Go here to see the 20th anniversary special section on the Flood of 1994.

There was an evacuation order at the worst of the flood, which, according to reports from the time, was followed with little complaint. Needed relief supplies were sent by Procter & Gamble, and clean drinking water became scarce.

But Baconton residents never experienced “ceiling-high” water in their homes or businesses, like what was seen in Albany and nearby Newton.

“It never got higher than about 3 feet,” said Annette Morman, Baconton’s mayor. Morman was a City Council member in 1994.

According to Morman and her cousin, Anthony Morman, who is with Baconton Public Works, some homes did sustain minor damage that required repair. No homes or public buildings, however, were lost to the flood.

In 1994, Jake Williams, then a volunteer firefighter, told The Albany Herald that water from the Flint River and from creeks north and south of Baconton formed a “horseshoe” around the town.

“Baconton would be under water if it weren’t on a hill,” Williams said in 1994. Baconton’s elevation is 174 feet above sea level. While Albany’s highest elevation is almost 30 feet higher at 203 feet and it sustained massive damage, most of the much smaller area of Baconton was above the floodplain.

Annette and Anthony Morman said that 20 years after the flood, there’s little evidence that any of it ever happened.

“We were blessed,” Annette Morman said.

“Yes, we were,” Anthony Morman agreed.