0

Facts and figures from the Flood of 1994

Community Development Block Grants to rebuild Albany neighborhoods reached $82.8 million.

Keon Harris, 18 months old, napping at the Albany High School Red Cross shelter on July 9, 1994. (Albany Herald file photo)

Keon Harris, 18 months old, napping at the Albany High School Red Cross shelter on July 9, 1994. (Albany Herald file photo)

photo

A dog awaits rescue as the flood waters keep rising. (Albany Herald file photo)

photo

A caravan from the Mormon Church, 5,000 strong, arrived at the YMCA on Gillionville Road to help flood victims with the cleanup. (Albany Herald File Photo)

photo

A crowd gathered at the Highland Avenue FEMA disaster relief center. (Albany Herald file photo)

While the figures concerning dollar amounts and damages changed frequently, the facts never did. People, thousands of them, lost their homes, belongings and way of life, some temporarily, others permanently.

PEOPLE

6,340 — The number of evacuees who were housed in 38 shelters in Dougherty County

23,000 — The number of people who lost their homes

225 — The number of homes that were rebuilt within the first year following the flood

5,884 — The number of families that received some type of flood aid

1,024 — Number of people rescued from the rising water

1,885 — Number of people housed in 750-square-foot FEMA trailers

520 — Number of patients transported by the Georgia Army National Guard, 148th Medical Company, in a 12-day period

2,800 — Number of uniformed National Guard personnel assigned to Albany

175,000 — Number of people across the state who were without drinking water

2,000 — Number of people who were out of work in Albany as a direct result of the flood

30,000 —Number of elderly Georgians affected by the flood

200 (at least) — Marine Corps Logistics Base-Albany personnel who issued blankets and cots, as well as transportation to shelters

200 (at least)— Additional MCLB-Albany employees and service personnel who filled sandbags and assisted with other needs

ANIMALS

200 — Dogs housed at the Albany Humane Society as of July 11

60 — Cats housed at the Albany Humane Society as of July 11

800 — Number of animals (including dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, birds) rescued in the first three days of the flood; many were in temporary foster care

30 — Pigmy goats that drowned at Chehaw

8 — Other animals that drowned at Chehaw, including one baby llama, one turkey, one (1,900-pound) bison, two hyrax, two wallabies and one mule

500 pounds — Pet food given to the Albany Humane Society within the first week of the flood

$15,000 — Thronateeska and American Kennel Club donations for pet treatment

PROPERTY DAMAGE

9,200 — The estimated number of homes damaged in Dougherty County

7 percent — Damaged Albany homes where the owner had flood insurance

$114 million — Damage to dwellings

$10 million — Damage sustained by Georgia Power’s two facilities

$5 million — Crisp County Power Commission’s damage at its earthen hydro dam at Lake Blackshear

$40 million — Albany State College infrastructure

$100 million — Albany State College buildings

180 — Businesses affected

10 percent — Affected business that had flood insurance

$17 million — Damage to businesses

23 square miles — Land under water in Dougherty County

400,000 — Acreage of farmland affected (statewide)

$500 million — The estimated damage to Dougherty County roads, bridges and other public facilities

1,500 — Homes damaged in Lee County

VOLUNTEERS

5,000 — Number of volunteers from the Mormon Church

6,000 — Additional volunteers, from individuals to various church groups

52 — Air Force Academy cadets

70 — Member churches of the Albany Area Interfaith Rebuilding Coalition (AAIRC)

350 (at least) — Homeowners assisted by AAIRC through services, supplies and volunteer labor

FEDERAL ASSISTANCE

$82.8 million — Community Development Block Grants to restore/rebuild neighborhoods (Albany)

$22 million — For the purchase and demolition of homes in the floodplain (Albany)

$7.5 million — To construct 99 low-income housing units

$892,125 — For the purchase and demolition of homes within Dougherty County

$717,375 — Community Development Block Grants (Dougherty County)

$33 million — Individual relief for housing and family grants

$2.4 million — Recreational facilities

$4.5 million — Two shopping centers

$11.5 million — Cleanup and water purification

$950,000 — Businesses that were impacted

$1.6 million — New day care facility

$200,000 — Historic preservation

$250,000 — Restoration for small industrial businesses

$2.9 million — Emergency food stamps (in the first three days of the flood)

$11,000 — Minimum grant to homeowners for making a home safe, sanitary and secure

Up to 18 months — Maximum assistance with rent

200 — FEMA trailers set up in Dougherty County

200 — Travel trailers set up in Dougherty County

DONATIONS

$1 million — Pharmaceutical products from Merck & Co.

$122,251 — Cash through the Albany Area Interfaith Rebuilding Coalition (1994 only)

60 —Families that received new furniture from a store owner in Lawrenceburg, Tenn.

$275,000 — Flood relief through the United Way (not including direct donations to member agencies)

$912,923 — Flood relief through the Albany Red Cross

$4 million — Cash donations given through the Salvation Army

$100,000 — Cash given by Miller Brewing

$100,000 — Cash given by Procter & Gamble

$145,000 — Value of donated diapers, toilet paper, adult briefs, paper towels and napkins from P&G

$100,000 — Bobs Candies for distribution among employees severely affected by the flood

$10,000 — Flood relief dollars from Kroger Co.

11,000 gallons — Coors Brewing Co.’s donation of Rocky Mountain bottled water

This list is a reflection of all the money and time given so freely by companies and groups of people but does not include every donation or volunteer.