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St. Patrick's Day Dishes

Corned Beef and Cabbage (Special photo)

Corned Beef and Cabbage (Special photo)

St. Patrick’s Day or the Feast of Saint Patrick, is celebrated each year on March 17. Several traditional customs accompany this day, such as wearing green, dying rivers, drinks and food green, and of course, eating delicious dishes.

Feasting on this day features traditional Irish food, including corned beef, corned cabbage, soda bread, potatoes, and shepherd’s pie. Many celebrations also hold an Irish breakfast of sausage, black and white pudding, fried eggs, and fried tomatoes.

You may not need any luck, but before you begin searching for that elusive four leaf clover, here are some traditional Irish recipes you may want to try.

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

For the brine:

1 cup kosher salt

1 cup brown sugar

1 1/2 tablespoons whole coriander

1 1/2 tablespoons whole mustard seeds

1 1/2 tablespoons whole black peppercorns

1 1/2 tablespoons whole allspice

4 sprigs fresh marjoram

4 sprigs fresh thyme leaves

2 bay leaves

1 (2 1/2 to 3 pound) brisket

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 onion, halved

6 carrots, coarsely chopped

1 head celery including leaves, coarsely chopped

1 head garlic, halved

3 sprigs fresh marjoram

2 bay leaves

1 small cabbage cut into 6 to 8 wedges

Herbed Root Vegetables:

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 pound new potatoes, scrubbed

1 pound baby carrots, trimmed and scrubbed

1 pound baby turnips, trimmed and scrubbed

1 pound baby parsnips, trimmed and scrubbed

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Herb Butter:

1/2 pound unsalted butter, softened

Recipes courtesy of Tyler Florence

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Irish Soda Bread Recipe (Special photo)

Irish Soda Bread

It appears everyone has their favorite Irish soda bread recipe. Some with caraway seeds, some with raisins, some with both or neither. The essential ingredients in a traditional Irish soda bread are flour, baking soda, salt, and buttermilk. The acid in buttermilk reacts with the base of the baking soda to provide the bread’s leavening. This soda bread is a slightly fancied up version of the Irish classic, with a little butter, sugar, an egg, and some raisins added to the base. Note that soda bread dries out quickly so is only good for a day or two. It is best eaten freshly baked and warm or toasted.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 40 minutes

Yield: One loaf

Ingredients

4 to 4 1/2 cups flour

2 Tbsp sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

4 Tbsp butter

1 cup raisins

1 large egg, lightly beaten

1 3/4 cups buttermilk

Method

Preheat oven to 425°. Whisk together 4 cups of flour, the sugar, salt, and baking soda into a large mixing bowl.

Using your (clean) fingers (or two knives or a pastry cutter), work the butter into the flour mixture until it resembles coarse meal, then add in the raisins.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture. Add beaten egg and buttermilk to well and mix in with a wooden spoon until dough is too stiff to stir. Dust hands with a little flour, then gently knead dough in the bowl just long enough to form a rough ball. If the dough is too sticky to work with, add in a little more flour. Do not over-knead! Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and shape into a round loaf. Note that the dough will be a little sticky, and quite shaggy (a little like a shortcake biscuit dough). You want to work it just enough so that the flour is just moistened and the dough just barely comes together. Shaggy is good. If you over-knead, the bread will end up tough.

Transfer dough to a large, lightly greased cast-iron skillet or a baking sheet (it will flatten out a bit in the pan or on the baking sheet). Using a serrated knife, score top of dough about an inch and a half deep in an “X” shape. The purpose of the scoring is to help heat get into the center of the dough while it cooks. Transfer to oven and bake until bread is golden and bottom sounds hollow when tapped, about 35-45 minutes. (If you use a cast iron pan, it may take a little longer as it takes longer for the pan to heat up than a baking sheet.) Check for doneness also by inserting a long, thin skewer into the center. If it comes out clean, it’s done.

Hint 1: If the top is getting too dark while baking, tent the bread with some aluminum foil.

Hint 2: If you use a cast iron skillet to cook the bread in the oven, be very careful when you take the pan out. It’s easy to forget that the handle is extremely hot. Cool the handle with an ice cube, or put a pot holder over it.

Remove pan or sheet from oven, let bread sit in the pan or on the sheet for 5-10 minutes, then remove to a rack to cool briefly. Serve bread warm, at room temperature, or sliced and toasted. Best when eaten warm and just baked.

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Homemade Irish Cream Recipe (Special photo)

Homemade Irish Cream Recipe

Prep/Total Time: 10 min.

Yield: 10 servings

Ingredients

1 can (12 ounces) evaporated milk

1 cup heavy whipping cream

1/2 cup 2% milk

1/4 cup sugar

2 tablespoons chocolate syrup

1 tablespoon instant coffee granules

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/4 teaspoon almond extract

Each Serving:

1/2 cup brewed coffee

Directions

In a blender, combine the first eight ingredients; cover and process until smooth. Store in the refrigerator.

For each serving, place coffee in a mug. Stir in 1/3 cup Irish cream. Heat mixture in a microwave if desired. Yield: 3-1/3 cups.