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United States Marine Corps Battle Color Detachment ceremony set for MCLB-Albany on Monday

Event returns to Albany after last year’s ceremony was cancelled because of federal budget cuts

Many consider the Silent Drill Platoon, a 24-man rifle platoon which performs precision moves without verbal commands, as one of the highlights of the The United States Marine Corps Battle Color Detachment ceremony which will be held at MCLB-Albany Monday. (File Photo)

Many consider the Silent Drill Platoon, a 24-man rifle platoon which performs precision moves without verbal commands, as one of the highlights of the The United States Marine Corps Battle Color Detachment ceremony which will be held at MCLB-Albany Monday. (File Photo)

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MCLB-Albany Commanding Officer Col. Don Davis (Staff Photo: Terry Lewis)

MCLB-ALBANY — After a one year hiatus, Albany officials are getting pumped to host the U.S. Marine Corps Battle Color Detachment ceremony on base Monday.

For the first time in recent memory, last year’s event was cancelled because of sequestration and federal budget cuts, and MCLB-Albany Commanding Officer Col. Don Davis vows this year’s ceremony will be one to remember.

The event will be held at the base at 1 p.m. Monday, and is free and open to the public. Comprised of three performing ceremonial units from Marine Barracks Washington, D.C., the U.S. Marine Corps Color Guard, the U.S. Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon and the U.S. Marine Corps Drum & Bugle Corps make up the Marine Corps Battle Color Detachment.

“This is a very special occasion for us and the community,’ Davis said Thursday. “It really gives people the flavor of the United States Marine Corps. Lots of people were upset last year when we had to cancel this event and our Fourth of July celebration. We didn’t really expect last year to be cancelled, but we knew if it happened it would be a last-minute decision.

Many consider the highlight of the day to be the Silent Drill Platoon, a 24-man rifle platoon which performs precision moves without verbal commands. Officials say it was first performed in the Sunset Parades of 1948 and received such an overwhelming response that it soon became a regular part of the parades at Marine Barracks Washington, D.C.

Traditionally known as “The Commandant’s Own,” the Marine Drum & Bugle Corps is comprised of 85 Marines recruited from various civilian drum corps, marching bands and other musical units within the Corps. The unit combines contemporary songs and traditional marching music with uniquely choreographed drill movements in a program entitled “Music in Motion.”

“This is a great opportunity for our Marines to see of their own as they have never seen them before and it is also a great opportunity to show our appreciation to Albany,” Davis said. “This isn’t your everyday event and it’s a big deal. I think the people who come out Monday will be very impressed, and it’s very important to us.”