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Dougherty County crime sweep does day two

A multi-agency crime eradication effort sweeps Dougherty County

Capt. Michael Persely with the Albany Police Department said suspects weren’t expecting a second day of FACT, a multi-agency crime sweep through Dougherty County Thursday. (Staff Photo: Jim West)

Capt. Michael Persely with the Albany Police Department said suspects weren’t expecting a second day of FACT, a multi-agency crime sweep through Dougherty County Thursday. (Staff Photo: Jim West)

ALBANY — The second wave of a multi-agency crime sweep through Dougherty County has been successful, said Capt. Michael Persely with the Albany Police Department, adding 26 arrests to Wednesday’s tally of 31.

Persely said the arrests stemmed from widely varied charges including probation violations, weapons offenses, drug charges and aggravated assault warrants.

Law enforcement agents from the city and county, as well as from around the state, collaborated in the two-day FACT or Facing Albany Crime Together operation, Persely said.

According to officials, the agencies included the Albany-Dougherty Drug Unit, the Albany Police Department, Dougherty County Police, Dougherty County Sheriff’s Office, Georgia Department of Corrections probation, the Albany Gang Task Force, the State Board of Pardons & Parole, Albany State University Police, Department of Juvenile Justice and the U.S. Marshall’s Fugitive Task Force.

“Coming back on the second day at a different time caught a lot of people off guard,” Persely said. “We’re not always routine, but we will change out our strategy.”

Persely said the second wave of FACT concentrated on sex offenders and their compliance with stringent parole conditions, as well as individuals classified by the Georgia Department of Corrections as “high risk subjects” presenting a possible security threat. According to Persely, high risk could apply to anyone associated with violent street gangs, motorcycle gangs or any other segment of organized crime.

“Increased police presence does have a significant impact upon crime,” Persely said. “We really don’t believe in doing quantity work. We want to do quality work, so if we make quality arrests, we can have an increased impact against crime.”