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Albany SCV camp to hold Confederate battle flag dedication

Large flag part of heritage group’s ‘Flags Across Georgia’ project

A 12-foot by 15-foot Confederate battle flag flies on a 55-foot flagpole alongside U.S. Highway 19 in north Mitchell County. A dedication ceremony for the banner, which is part of the Sons of Confederate Veterans organization’s “Flags Across Georgia” project, will be held on location Saturday at 9 a.m. (Special photo)

A 12-foot by 15-foot Confederate battle flag flies on a 55-foot flagpole alongside U.S. Highway 19 in north Mitchell County. A dedication ceremony for the banner, which is part of the Sons of Confederate Veterans organization’s “Flags Across Georgia” project, will be held on location Saturday at 9 a.m. (Special photo)

ALBANY — The Sons of Confederate Veterans will hold a flag dedication ceremony on location Saturday for the Confederate battle flag flying on a 55-foot flagpole alongside U.S. Highway 19 in north Mitchell County, just south of Baconton.

The installation of the 12-foot by 15-foot flag, which was a project of the Albany Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp 141, was completed in January and was partially funded by monies received from the state for the sale of specialty vehicle tags that bear the SCV emblem and Confederate battle flag.

Baconton resident George Davis, who is a member of the Albany SCV camp, has allowed the flag to fly on his property at no charge. The Mitchell County flag is the 11th in the state to be erected as part of the SCV’s “Flags Across Georgia” project.

“The Confederate battle flag serves as a reminder of the principles and values America was founded upon,” said Albany SCV Camp Commander James King, who will deliver the keynote address at Saturday’s 9 a.m. dedication ceremony. “The four principles and values represented by both the Confederate flag and the U.S. Betsy Ross flag are limited constitutional federal government, states’ rights, resistance to tyranny and Christian values.

“The Confederate battle flag has been controversial for many years because of misuse by racist groups, including the KKK and skinheads. But these same groups have also abused the U.S. flag, which is actually the official flag of the KKK. The Sons of Confederate Veterans organization in its 2006 national convention passed a resolution condemning the use, misuse and abuse of the Confederate flag by such groups.”

The SCV’s “Flags Across Georgia” project brings attention to the Confederate battle flag by placing large flags at highly visible locations on private property alongside major highways.

“The Confederate flag and the U.S. flag are held to different levels of accountability,” King said. “The U.S. flag gets a complete pass while the Confederate flag is berated, disparaged and condemned. Yet the U.S. ‘Stars and Stripes’ has far more baggage. If flew over slave ships for many years going to and from Africa, as well as the genocide and near extermination of Native Americans.

“Neither the Confederate flag nor the flags of any Southern colony or state ever flew over any slave ship.”