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Charlie Killmaster, state deer and feral hog biologist with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, examines some peanuts that suffered feral hog damage on a farm in Dooly County. (Special photo: Clint Thompson)

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Feral hogs destroying farmland in Southwest Georgia

Peak times for hog damage are during planting and harvest seasons.

Feral hogs are a major problem in large part because of their reproductive capacities. Charlie Killmaster, a deer and feral hog biologist with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, says unlike deer, which breed in the fall and have their young in the spring, feral hogs breed whenthey’re ready and don’t stop.

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