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Clint Thompson

Stories by Clint

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Worth agent middleman for agricultural information

County agents get involved in all types of agriculture

One day Scott Carlson may be in a cornfield listening to a farmer’s questions about insect control. The next, Carlson is on the UGA Tifton Campus searching for answers from researchers in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

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Pest harms roots of pecan trees

Research in Tifton may lead to control methods

Prionous root borers, the larval stage of the beetle, damages pecan tree roots by depriving trees of essential water nutrients. This makes them vulnerable to heavy winds. The larvae can also move through the soil and feed on an irrigation system if they encounter a pipe between pecan roots.

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Farmers to get farm bill education

Series of meetings planned in South Georgia

Don Shurley and Nathan Smith will lead a series of six regional meetings designed to educate Georgia row crop producers and landowners about the new farm bill. Shurley and Smith are faculty with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

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Tift County man named Georgia’s top farmer

Philip Grimes honored for his innovative approach to maximizing production

Grimes will represent Georgia at the Sunbelt Ag Expo in October, where he will vie against eight other state winners for the title of Southeastern Farmer of the Year.

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Pecan growers worried about 2014 production

This year’s yield could be worse than last year’s dismal crop

Georgia farmers can be encouraged by the state yield numbers that indicate more than 60 million pounds of pecans will be produced in 2014. This is a little more than first predicted. Many growers are holding off on selling their pecans because of low prices.

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Selling cattle may be best option

Short supply makes cattle prices tempting

Cattlemen are also taking land out of pasture production and putting it into other crops, so fewer small calves are available to be bought. The supply is the lowest since 1951.

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Irrigation specialist focuses on water management

Most research handled at Camilla facility

Wesley Porter primarily works on row crops but he also has responsibilities in horticulture, turf, trees and orchards, in both Georgia and Alabama.

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Selling cattle may be best option

Short supply makes cattle prices tempting

Cattlemen are also taking land out of pasture production and putting it into other crops, so fewer small calves are available to be bought. The supply is the lowest since 1951.

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Less acreage, high yields highlight 2013 peanut season

Despite high yields being produced, peanut prices are still hovering around the $425 per ton mark, far below the $500 per ton level farmers crave and were able to achieve a couple of years ago.

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Peanut producers worry about thrips

Advice given on how to protect against the tiny inspect

There are more than 7,000 species of thrips, but only two cause problems for Georgia farmers and UGA researchers — tobacco thrips and western flower thrips.

Pecan crop worse than originally feared

Pecan scab, a fungal disease, cuts expected yields considerably

Due in large part to pecan scab, a fungal disease that thrives in wet conditions, Georgia’s pecan crop is expected to total between 50 million and 60 million pounds, instead of the normal 90 million.

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Tifton researcher attempts to breed scab-resistant pecan variety

Rain, pecan scab reduces pecan crop this season

The disease affected two of Georgia’s most common pecan cultivars — Desirable and Stuart trees — but the disease is not uniform across tree varieties.

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Georgia peanut crop experiencing good year

Peanut economists expect Georgia peanut production to hit close to a two tons per acre

Georgia peanut acreage, at 430,000 acres this year, could increase by 15 percent in 2014, forecasters say.

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Watermelon disease a double whammy for Georgia growers

The effects of the water mold sometimes are not evident until after shipment

Georgia watermelon farmers found Phytophthora to be a hit to the wallet after heavy rains in mid summer made the disease more widespread than normal.

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Watermelon disease a double whammy for Georgia growers

The effects of the water mold sometimes are not evident until after shipment

Georgia watermelon farmers found Phytophthora to be a hit to the wallet after heavy rains in mid summer made the disease more widespread than normal.

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Tifton soil expert enjoying teaching at UGA-Tifton campus

Glen Harris teaches a soils and hydrology class at the Tifton campus of UGA

Glen Harris, one of the state’s leading soils fertility experts, is called upon to assist with a wide range of questions regarding cotton, peanuts, corn and soybeans. He may not have all the answers, but he is determined to find them when called upon.

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Georgia peanut yields higher than expected

Crop pales in comparison to last year’s yield

It was feared earlier in the season that high accumulations of rainfall during the summer washed out portions of farmers’ peanut fields. While reports are low of that being the case, rain did provide other farmers with enough water for their crops to exceed normal growth.

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Scab hurting pecan producers in Dougherty, Lee and Mitchell counties

Georgia pecan production drops from 90 million pounds to around 65 to 70 million pounds

Increased rainfall in the summer opened the door to disease and drastically lowered individual size and quantity of pecans produced in Georgia this year.

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Camilla center earns award for irrigation project

The C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park has won a top award for its Smart Irrigation Month campaign this summer.

UGA president visits Sunbelt Expo

President Morehead’s visit to Moultrie is a small part of his plan to become more informed about Georgia agriculture, which generates $71.1 billion annually.

UGA president visits Sunbelt Expo

President Morehead’s visit to Moultrie is a small part of his plan to become more informed about Georgia agriculture, which generates $71.1 billion annually.

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Kudzu bugs costly concern for soybean farmers

If left untreated, kudzu bug damage will result in a 20 percent yeild loss for soybean farmers.

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Farm girl helps shape future of agriculture

Ag teachers cover various topics ranging from working on a lawnmower engine to growing plants in a greenhouse.

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UGA students excel at Tifton campus

The University of Georgia Tifton campus’ recipe for a successful academic program combines three ingredients: small class sizes, a hands-on learning approach and world-class scientists. The result is an academic program that appeals to individuals vying for top employment opportunities in agriculture.

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Unmanned aerial vehicles could be soaring success for farmers

This technology will not be available for commercial use until 2015.

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Student an ambassador for UGA's Tifton campus

Shannon Parrish of Berrien County is chosen an ambassador to help attract students to UGA’s four-year degree programs at ABAC.

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Cotton, peanut tour scheduled

A tour featuring cotton and peanut research is scheduled for Southwest Georgia farmers.

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UGA research to be featured at annual peanut tour

The 27th annual Georgia Peanut Tour will be held in south Georgia, Sept. 17-19. Started as an effort to attract more buyers to the state, the tour is an opportunity for industry leaders and farmers to showcase the crop’s quality and planting and how peanuts are handled post-harvest.

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Burrower bugs silent threats to peanuts

A silent peanut pest is eating away at profits and has Georgia producers concerned. The burrower bug can wreak havoc on a farmer’s peanuts without him even knowing.

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Farmers use soil moisture sensors to determine when to irrigate

In hopes of providing farmers a better way to irrigate, a Tifton professor is researching soil moisture sensors.

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Pinkeye leaves mark on cows

Pinkeye, also called conjunctivitis, is redness and swelling of the mucous membrane that lines the eyelid and eye surface.

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Segers joins UGA as beef cattle specialist

Jacob Segers will once again work alongside cattle farmers in what has emerged as a booming business statewide.

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Stripling Irrigation Research Park to hold field day

That Aug. 1 event will showcase ongoing UGA agricultural research.

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Conference to highlight agricultural exports

The Georgia Ports Authority hopes to double its capacity within the next decade, which is good news for Georgia farmers.

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Rainfall keeps fields soggy

More growers than usual are hiring airplanes to apply chemicals to their crops.

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4-H2O camp provides fun, educational experience

Water and 4-H make for a good team. Together, they made a splash last week as children were entertained and educated about water's role in everyday life at the sixth annual 4-H2O Camp.

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UGA scientists seek disease-resistant crops

Plant pathologist Katherine Stevenson focuses on fungicide resistance for crops like watermelons.

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Young scholars mingle with UGA scientists

Youth get to visit with world agriculture experts during an internship program at the University of Georgia’s Tifton campus.

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Farm Bureau gets look at latest research

Find this story and other news, sports and features items at www.albanyherald.com.

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Rain coming frequently in farm belt

After some dry growing seasons, Georgia farmers are getting plenty of moisture this year.

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Father's Day a reminder of blessings

Unable to have children, a Tifton couple has adopted four children.

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Tobacco reverses slide, still significantly lower

A government tobacco buy-out has cut into production of a crop that was once one of Georgia's largest.

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New weed threatens cotton producers

Extension officials estimate growers spend $100 million a year to control Palmer amaranth.

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New entomologist joins UGA at Tifton

Mark Abney will be available for peanut farmers who want to talk about what’s “bugging” them.

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Energy conservation benefits state's farmers

A University of Georgia public service associate converts farm waste materials into energy.

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New method makes truffles easier to find

Dogs at Wynfield Plantation in Albany are trained to find fungal delicacies growing in pecan groves.

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Virus a chronic threat to tomatoes

Researchers say eradicating the tomato yellow curl virus is unlikely, so they're focusing on better management of it.

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Students earn UGA degrees on Tifton campus

Brittaney Schwing, of Chula, receives the Student MVP award during graduation ceremonies.

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Bigger profits lead farmers to embrace auto-steer technology

Auto-steer systems use GPS technology to help farmers guide their tractors through fields.

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Tifton professor puts training into practice

An animal and dairy science instructor recently had hands-on experience at his family farm.

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