Agencies continue to trace tainted lettuce

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta is looking into the recent multistate outbreak of Cyclospora illnesses linked to fresh basil exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV located in Morelos, Mexico, with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and state and local partners are investigating a multistate outbreak of Cyclospora illnesses linked to fresh basil exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV located in Morelos, Mexico.

Siga Logistics de RL de CV recalled potentially affected basil July 24, 2019.

Consumers should not to buy, eat or serve any fresh basil exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV located in Morelos, Mexico. Do not consume or serve uncooked items like pesto or salad, that may include fresh basil from Mexico, unless you are certain that the fresh basil was not exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV.

However, if consumers cannot determine if the basil is from this company, they should avoid basil from Mexico. If they do not know what country the basil is from, they should avoid it.

The FDA strongly advises importers, suppliers, and distributors, as well as restaurants, retailers, and other food service providers to not sell, serve or distribute fresh basil exported by Siga Logistics de RL de CV located in Morelos, Mexico. If you are uncertain of the source, do not sell, serve or distribute the fresh imported basil.

Cyclospora cayetanensis is a parasite that is so small it can only be seen under a microscope. When people eat food or drink water that’s contaminated with Cyclospora, they can get an intestinal illness called cyclosporiasis.

Cyclospora is generally transmitted when infected feces contaminate food or water. It’s unlikely to be transmitted directly from person to person because the Cyclospora parasite needs time (days to weeks) after being passed in a bowel movement to become infectious for another person.

The time between becoming infected and becoming sick is usually about one week. Cyclospora infects the small intestine (bowel) and usually causes watery diarrhea, with frequent, sometimes explosive, bowel movements.

Other common symptoms include loss of appetite, weight loss, stomach cramps/pain, bloating, increased gas, nausea, and fatigue. People may also experience vomiting, body aches, headache, low-grade fever, and other flu-like symptoms. Some people who are infected with Cyclospora do not have any symptoms. If not treated, the illness may last from a few days to a month or longer. Symptoms may seem to go away and then return one or more times (relapse). It’s common to feel very tired.

People living or traveling in countries where cyclosporiasis is common, including certain tropical or subtropical regions of the world, may be at increased risk for infection. However, people living in other areas can become infected with Cyclospora by consuming food or water that has been contaminated with the parasite.

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