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DULUTH – With Aug. 11 almost here, Georgia 811 hopes this date on the calendar, 8/11, will serve as a natural reminder for residents to contact 811 prior to any digging project. Georgia residents can contact 811 at Georgia811.com or via the three-digit 811 phone number to have underground public utility lines marked. Every few minutes an underground utility line is damaged because someone decided to dig without first contacting 811.

When calling 811, homeowners and contractors are connected to Georgia 811, the local one-call center, which notifies the appropriate utilities companies of their intent to dig. Professional locators are then sent to the requested digging site to mark the approximate locations of underground lines with flags, spray paint or both.

Striking a single line can cause injury, repair costs, fines and inconvenient outages. Every digging project, no matter how large or small, warrants contacting 811. Installing a mailbox, building a deck, planting a tree and laying a patio are all examples of digging projects that need a call to 811 before starting.

“On Aug. 11 and throughout the year, we remind homeowners and professional contractors alike to contact 811 before digging to reduce the risk of striking an underground utility line,” Meghan Wade, president and CEO for Georgia 811, said in a news release. “Aside from calling, you can request a dig ticket at Georgia811.com, so it is now easier than ever to know which utilities are buried in your area.”

This year Georgia 811 is kicking off the #Georgia811Virtual5K to help promote safe digging to the public. The 5K registration is free, and participants who share Georgia 811’s social media message will be put in a drawing to win prizes. Participants can complete their run/walk/jog anytime between Aug. 11 and Sept. 12, and shirt sale proceeds will benefit the P4 Foundation. Registration can be found under the “About Us” tab at Georgia811.com.

Visit www.Georgia811.com for more information about 811 and safe digging practices.

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