Joe Biden was sworn in Wednesday as the 46th United States President, taking the reins of a country in crisis. But his task on the global stage will be daunting, too.

World leaders reacted to Biden's inauguration by offering congratulations, jockeying for position at the forefront of his foreign policy agenda, and in some cases pleading for the reversal of his predecessor's policies.

Among most messages was a palpable sense of relief, as the international community embraced Biden's pledge to reenter a series of global pacts and organizations that President Donald Trump cut loose.

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Here's what leaders have said so far.

European Union

"Once again, after four long years, Europe has a friend in the White House," European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said on Wednesday, leaving no uncertainty about her verdict on Trump's relationship with the bloc.

"This new dawn in America is the moment we've been waiting for so long. Europe is ready for a new start with our oldest and most trusted partner," she said in the European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium.

Von der Leyen said Biden's inauguration would "be a message of healing for a deeply divided nation and it will be a message of hope for a world that is waiting for the US to be back in the circle of like-minded states."

On Twitter, she added: "The United States is back. And Europe stands ready. To reconnect with an old and trusted partner, to breathe new life into our cherished alliance."

"It's time to bring back conviction & common sense and rejuvenate our EU-US relationship," Charles Michel, President of the European Council, added later.

Biden has signaled a warmer partnership with Europe than Trump, who frequently criticized the EU on trade during his administration. His attacks on some European leaders led to frosty scenes at a number of summits.

"From our perspective, Trump saw Europe as an enemy," a senior European diplomat told CNN last week. "The lasting impact of 'America First' is the US having fewer friends in Europe."

China

Hours before the inauguration, Beijing expressed hope that Biden would "look at China rationally and objectively" to repair "serious damage" in bilateral ties caused by the Trump presidency.

"In the past four years, the US administration has made fundamental mistakes in its strategic perception of China ... interfering in China's internal affairs, suppressing and smearing China, and causing serious damage to China-US relations," foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said at a press briefing Wednesday.

The Biden administration should, Hua said, "look at China rationally and objectively, meet China halfway and, in the spirit of mutual respect, equality and mutual benefit, push China-US relations back to the right track of healthy and stable development as soon as possible."

One of the main planks of Trump's foreign policy platform has been his trade war with China. The Trump administration's 11th-hour declaration that China is committing genocide against Uyghur Muslims will heighten tensions with Beijing, though Biden's nominee for Secretary of State said Tuesday that he agreed with the designation.

"If the new US administration can adopt a more rational and responsible attitude in formulating its foreign policy, I think it will be warmly welcomed by everyone in the international community," she added.

Iran

Iran's President, Hassan Rouhani, called on Biden to return to the 2015 nuclear deal and lift US sanctions on Iran, overturning a key part of Trump's foreign policy program.

"The ball is in the US' court now. If Washington returns to Iran's 2015 nuclear deal, we will also fully respect our commitments under the pact," Rouhani said in a televised cabinet meeting.

He also launched a scathing attack on the outgoing President. A "tyrant's era came to an end and today is the final day of his ominous reign," Rouhani said of Trump's departure. "Someone for whom all of his four years bore no fruit other than injustice and corruption and causing problems for his own people and the world."

Biden has said he plans to return to the nuclear deal with Iran, which was signed when he was Barack Obama's Vice President. Biden's national security aides have suggested they would like further negotiations on Iran's ballistic missile capabilities, though Rouhani has said the missile program is non-negotiable.

Germany

The German President said he was relieved that Biden would be sworn in Wednesday, calling it "a good day for democracy."

"In the United States, (democracy) held up against a lot of pressure," Frank Walter Steinmeier said in a statement.

"Despite internal hostility, America's institutions have proven strong -- election workers, governors, judiciary, and Congress," he said. "I am relieved that Joe Biden is sworn in as President today and coming into the White House. I know that this feeling is shared by many people in Germany."

Steinmeier also warned against the populist brand of politics that Trump embraced. "Despite all the joy we have about today, we must not forget that populism has seduced even the most powerful democracy in the world," he said. "We must resolutely oppose polarization, protect and strengthen the public space of our democracies, and shape politics on the basis of reason and facts."

United Kingdom

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he was looking forward to a close relationship with Biden's administration.

"In our fight against Covid and across climate change, defence, security and in promoting and defending democracy, our goals are the same and our nations will work hand in hand to achieve them," Johnson said in a statement Tuesday.

Johnson warmly welcomed Trump on his visits to the UK, with Trump once claiming that the Prime Minister was nicknamed "Britain Trump." But the outgoing US leader was unpopular among Britons, and Johnson will be keen to secure a post-Brexit trade deal with Biden.

The new President could end up making two trips to the UK in 2021, with Johnson saying he looks forward to welcoming him to the G7 summit and to the hotly anticipated 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland. "Only through international cooperation can we truly overcome the shared challenges which we face," Johnson said on Tuesday.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, was more blunt in her remarks in the Scottish Parliament on Wednesday. Sturgeon wished Biden and Kamala Harris well, adding: "I'm sure many of us across the chamber and across Scotland will be very happy to say cheerio to Donald Trump today."

"I think 'don't haste ye back' might be the perfect rejoinder to him," she added.

Mexico

Mexico's President, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, wished Biden well ahead of his inauguration on Wednesday.

During his daily briefing, López Obrador outlined three themes as key areas of the bilateral relationship with the US. "Those three themes are very important: pandemic, economic recovery and migration," he said.

López Obrador also said Biden should take steps to settle the immigration status of Mexicans working in the US.

Ireland

"Today a true friend of Ireland Joe Biden became the 46th President of the USA," Irish Prime Minister Micheál Martin said. "As he said in his speech, it is a day of history and hope and I look forward to forging ever closer ties between our two great nations."

"Also, a historic day as Kamala Harris is sworn in as the first woman Vice President of the USA. I wish her and President Biden every success in meeting the challenges ahead," he added.

Biden has frequently touted his Irish heritage, and his win led to celebrations in Ballina -- the town of just 10,000 in the west of Ireland where his ancestors hail from.

NATO

NATO's Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg called Biden's inauguration "the start of a new chapter for the transatlantic Alliance."

"U.S. leadership remains essential as we work together to protect our democracies, our values and the rules-based international order," he said.

"NATO Allies need to stand together to address the security consequences of the rise of China, the threat of terrorism, including in Afghanistan and Iraq, and a more assertive Russia."

CNN's Ramin Mostaghim, Eleanor Pickston, Luke McGee and Stephanie Halasz contributed.

(1) comment

Red dog

Of course World leaders welcome Biden as president. They know Biden is weak and will be a pushover. The world leaders will have Biden kissing their feet.

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